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Hur botas resurssjukan?

Dannerhäll, Alexander LU (2016) NEKH01 20152
Department of Economics
Abstract (Swedish)
This study is concerned with the subject of the resource curse. When countries
discover significant natural resource reserves they counterintuitively exhibit
dropping growth rates despite its high world market price. Several researchers
have studied this phenomenon and labelled it the “resource curse”. They have
tracked it to a number of causes, including how massive mineral windfalls affect
the production structure and rate of diversification in the host economy. One
significant outlier to this theory, however, is Norway. Despite being in possession
of vast oil reserves, the country’s economy has not to a large extent fallen victim
to the symptoms of the resource curse. This study attempts to test if Norway’s
example can be... (More)
This study is concerned with the subject of the resource curse. When countries
discover significant natural resource reserves they counterintuitively exhibit
dropping growth rates despite its high world market price. Several researchers
have studied this phenomenon and labelled it the “resource curse”. They have
tracked it to a number of causes, including how massive mineral windfalls affect
the production structure and rate of diversification in the host economy. One
significant outlier to this theory, however, is Norway. Despite being in possession
of vast oil reserves, the country’s economy has not to a large extent fallen victim
to the symptoms of the resource curse. This study attempts to test if Norway’s
example can be applied generally to other afflicted economies. Using an
econometric panel regression of data from a number of mineral-dependent
economies the study draws from a case-study of the Norwegian response to the
oil-findings. Due to a lack of data-availability, however, any reliable and definite
conclusion is hard to draw. What may be a cause of despair may also be a
suggestion for further studies aiming at wider and more precise data collection
and definition of key variables. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Dannerhäll, Alexander LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKH01 20152
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Mineral wealth, Dutch Disease, Resource curse
language
Swedish
id
8572707
date added to LUP
2016-02-11 14:59:06
date last changed
2016-02-11 14:59:06
@misc{8572707,
  abstract     = {This study is concerned with the subject of the resource curse. When countries
discover significant natural resource reserves they counterintuitively exhibit
dropping growth rates despite its high world market price. Several researchers
have studied this phenomenon and labelled it the “resource curse”. They have
tracked it to a number of causes, including how massive mineral windfalls affect
the production structure and rate of diversification in the host economy. One
significant outlier to this theory, however, is Norway. Despite being in possession
of vast oil reserves, the country’s economy has not to a large extent fallen victim
to the symptoms of the resource curse. This study attempts to test if Norway’s
example can be applied generally to other afflicted economies. Using an
econometric panel regression of data from a number of mineral-dependent
economies the study draws from a case-study of the Norwegian response to the
oil-findings. Due to a lack of data-availability, however, any reliable and definite
conclusion is hard to draw. What may be a cause of despair may also be a
suggestion for further studies aiming at wider and more precise data collection
and definition of key variables.},
  author       = {Dannerhäll, Alexander},
  keyword      = {Mineral wealth,Dutch Disease,Resource curse},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Hur botas resurssjukan?},
  year         = {2016},
}