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In search of queer in the Christian tradition

Sundén, Hanna LU (2016) TLVK10 20152
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies
Abstract (Swedish)
Queer theology is relative new in the Academy of Theology, especially in the Swedish context. It derives from both liberation and feminist theology. Furthermore queer theology can also be understood as an extension of queer theory. Gerard Loughlin has intentionally incorporated elements from queer theory in his theological work. The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the texts of St. Augustine and KG Hammar - theologians of different times and church traditions - through a queer theological perspective. The view of God, the marriage, and the claim that homosexuality is rather central than marginal to Christian tradition are the three central issues discussed in order to fulfill the purpose of this thesis.

Results of my queer... (More)
Queer theology is relative new in the Academy of Theology, especially in the Swedish context. It derives from both liberation and feminist theology. Furthermore queer theology can also be understood as an extension of queer theory. Gerard Loughlin has intentionally incorporated elements from queer theory in his theological work. The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the texts of St. Augustine and KG Hammar - theologians of different times and church traditions - through a queer theological perspective. The view of God, the marriage, and the claim that homosexuality is rather central than marginal to Christian tradition are the three central issues discussed in order to fulfill the purpose of this thesis.

Results of my queer theological study of the texts suggest that Hammar’s view of God can be understood through Loughlin’s definition of God as queer. St. Augustine refers to God using masculine terms and therefore a queer interpretation is hard to be applied. At the same time he expresses a profound desire for God that could be compatible with queer theology. Furthermore the description of God and Christ as a bridegroom is also compatible with how marriage is perceived in the queer theological perspective. Hammar does not provide any metaphore for a queer interpretation of marriage in the texts. His understanding that God is love and that Jesus does not define any limits between himself and other people can be interpreted as they accept all kind of relationships including queer. Nevertheless no comment about homosexuality is explicitly stated in the text. Lastly the passionate description of St. Augustine male friend can confirm Loughlin’s claim that homosexuality is rather central than marginal to Christian tradition. (Less)
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author
Sundén, Hanna LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A queer theological analysis of S.t Augustine and KG Hammar
course
TLVK10 20152
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Queer Theology, St. Augustine, KG Hammar, Gerhard Loughlin, identity, sexuality, God, Christology
language
Swedish
id
8599563
date added to LUP
2016-05-11 08:59:19
date last changed
2016-05-11 08:59:19
@misc{8599563,
  abstract     = {Queer theology is relative new in the Academy of Theology, especially in the Swedish context. It derives from both liberation and feminist theology. Furthermore queer theology can also be understood as an extension of queer theory. Gerard Loughlin has intentionally incorporated elements from queer theory in his theological work. The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the texts of St. Augustine and KG Hammar - theologians of different times and church traditions - through a queer theological perspective. The view of God, the marriage, and the claim that homosexuality is rather central than marginal to Christian tradition are the three central issues discussed in order to fulfill the purpose of this thesis.

Results of my queer theological study of the texts suggest that Hammar’s view of God can be understood through Loughlin’s definition of God as queer. St. Augustine refers to God using masculine terms and therefore a queer interpretation is hard to be applied. At the same time he expresses a profound desire for God that could be compatible with queer theology. Furthermore the description of God and Christ as a bridegroom is also compatible with how marriage is perceived in the queer theological perspective. Hammar does not provide any metaphore for a queer interpretation of marriage in the texts. His understanding that God is love and that Jesus does not define any limits between himself and other people can be interpreted as they accept all kind of relationships including queer. Nevertheless no comment about homosexuality is explicitly stated in the text. Lastly the passionate description of St. Augustine male friend can confirm Loughlin’s claim that homosexuality is rather central than marginal to Christian tradition.},
  author       = {Sundén, Hanna},
  keyword      = {Queer Theology,St. Augustine,KG Hammar,Gerhard Loughlin,identity,sexuality,God,Christology},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {In search of queer in the Christian tradition},
  year         = {2016},
}