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Self-Driving Cars: Diffusion of Radical Innovations and Technology Acceptance

Engqvist, Hannes (2016) MIO920
Production Management
Abstract
Abstract
The self-driving car (SDC) is about to exit fantasy and enter reality. SDCs are expected to be available
for purchase in just a few years, and the new technologies that enable autonomous driving hold much
promise, regarding safety, environmental impact, increased mobility and higher comfortability.
However, there are worrying prospects, too. Some experts worry that the autonomous car might in
practice lead to higher rates of pollution and more time and money spent on commuting. By making
personal transport more enjoyable, as well as safer, there is a risk of drastically increased rates of urban
sprawl, which is harmful to both the environment and the economy. Gains in fuel-efficiency may be
off-set by increased... (More)
Abstract
The self-driving car (SDC) is about to exit fantasy and enter reality. SDCs are expected to be available
for purchase in just a few years, and the new technologies that enable autonomous driving hold much
promise, regarding safety, environmental impact, increased mobility and higher comfortability.
However, there are worrying prospects, too. Some experts worry that the autonomous car might in
practice lead to higher rates of pollution and more time and money spent on commuting. By making
personal transport more enjoyable, as well as safer, there is a risk of drastically increased rates of urban
sprawl, which is harmful to both the environment and the economy. Gains in fuel-efficiency may be
off-set by increased levels of driving, in accordance with the so-called Jevon’s Paradox of behavioral
compensation.
This paper examines the status and the expected projection of these technologies. Although SDC
technology has been thought to be just around the corner several times before, this time is believed
to be different. The key difference is that the SDCs considered in this paper will work independently,
meaning that they do not require any external additions to infrastructure to function properly.
The paper takes a customer-oriented perspective and provides insight to managers and decision-
makers. It poses questions regarding technology acceptance: whether consumers will want to have
cars that can drive themselves.
To answer the questions posed, expert interviews and an expert survey have been carried out.
Additionally, a substantial literary review was undertaken, much of which related to expectations on
SDC technology, traffic issues, innovation and technology acceptance. A comprehensive model for
measuring and assessing acceptance of SDCs, called the Robotic Car Acceptance Model or ROCAM, is
proposed.
Additionally, this paper lays out a detailed design of a possibly follow-up study. Two scenarios
concerning the future of SDCs have been constructed, and these form the foundation of the proposed
study. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Engqvist, Hannes
supervisor
organization
course
MIO920
year
type
M1 - University Diploma
subject
keywords
autonomous vehicles, self-driving cars, future traffic, technology acceptance, acceptance model
other publication id
16/5539
language
English
id
8870585
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:28:16
date last changed
2016-04-01 11:28:16
@misc{8870585,
  abstract     = {Abstract 
The self-driving car (SDC) is about to exit fantasy and enter reality. SDCs are expected to be available 
for purchase in just a few years, and the new technologies that enable autonomous driving hold much 
promise, regarding safety, environmental impact, increased mobility and higher comfortability. 
However, there are worrying prospects, too. Some experts worry that the autonomous car might in 
practice lead to higher rates of pollution and more time and money spent on commuting. By making 
personal transport more enjoyable, as well as safer, there is a risk of drastically increased rates of urban 
sprawl, which is harmful to both the environment and the economy. Gains in fuel-efficiency may be 
off-set by increased levels of driving, in accordance with the so-called Jevon’s Paradox of behavioral 
compensation. 
This paper examines the status and the expected projection of these technologies. Although SDC 
technology has been thought to be just around the corner several times before, this time is believed 
to be different. The key difference is that the SDCs considered in this paper will work independently, 
meaning that they do not require any external additions to infrastructure to function properly. 
The paper takes a customer-oriented perspective and provides insight to managers and decision-
makers. It poses questions regarding technology acceptance: whether consumers will want to have 
cars that can drive themselves. 
To answer the questions posed, expert interviews and an expert survey have been carried out. 
Additionally, a substantial literary review was undertaken, much of which related to expectations on 
SDC technology, traffic issues, innovation and technology acceptance. A comprehensive model for 
measuring and assessing acceptance of SDCs, called the Robotic Car Acceptance Model or ROCAM, is 
proposed. 
Additionally, this paper lays out a detailed design of a possibly follow-up study. Two scenarios 
concerning the future of SDCs have been constructed, and these form the foundation of the proposed 
study.},
  author       = {Engqvist, Hannes},
  keyword      = {autonomous vehicles,self-driving cars,future traffic,technology acceptance,acceptance model},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Self-Driving Cars: Diffusion of Radical Innovations and Technology Acceptance},
  year         = {2016},
}