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What perioperative situations are concerning to an anaesthesiologist, and what are some of the related joint cognitive system adaptations?

Motavalli, Al LU (2016) FLMU06 20152
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety
Abstract
Bridging the gap between understanding work-as-imagined and work-as-done in the perioperative work context represents an important aim of cognitive systems engineering research. Researching this context using a joint cognitive systems theoretical approach can reveal patterns of adaptation that have important implications for system design. Traditional research approaches by non-domain investigators may plausibly place constraints on the body of knowledge formed. Therefore, this study aimed to utilise a relatively new, in-domain, practitioner-centred methodology called analytic autoethnography, to study perioperative work from a joint cognitive systems theoretical perspective. This was done by an anaesthesiologist practitioner-researcher... (More)
Bridging the gap between understanding work-as-imagined and work-as-done in the perioperative work context represents an important aim of cognitive systems engineering research. Researching this context using a joint cognitive systems theoretical approach can reveal patterns of adaptation that have important implications for system design. Traditional research approaches by non-domain investigators may plausibly place constraints on the body of knowledge formed. Therefore, this study aimed to utilise a relatively new, in-domain, practitioner-centred methodology called analytic autoethnography, to study perioperative work from a joint cognitive systems theoretical perspective. This was done by an anaesthesiologist practitioner-researcher analysing situations of concern to him in his own work contexts. Findings yielded a number of categories of adaptive and maladaptive strategies and conditions, including some that have not previously been described, potentially opening a number of new research spaces. To better describe and account for the studied situations and adaptations, conceptual categories of joint cognitive systems theory were broadened to include a modified and extended group of constructs from a symbolic interactionism framework, these constructs being: artifacts, naturifacts, mentifacts, and sociofacts. A focal conceptualisation of ‘power’ that could better describe power relationships across joint cognitive system objects was also developed. Under this conceptualisation, a reformulation of cognitive systems engineering aims was suggested. This included that research would seek to understand power relationships amongst symbolic objects in sociotechnical systems, with interventions subsequently designed for the purposes of modifying objects, and hence their power relationships, in order to support cognitive work. (Less)
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author
Motavalli, Al LU
supervisor
organization
course
FLMU06 20152
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
human factors, symbolic interactionism, power, anesthesia, perioperative, autoethnography, joint cognitive systems, cognitive systems engineering, FLMU06
language
English
id
8872841
date added to LUP
2016-05-19 11:25:03
date last changed
2016-06-27 09:35:28
@misc{8872841,
  abstract     = {Bridging the gap between understanding work-as-imagined and work-as-done in the perioperative work context represents an important aim of cognitive systems engineering research. Researching this context using a joint cognitive systems theoretical approach can reveal patterns of adaptation that have important implications for system design. Traditional research approaches by non-domain investigators may plausibly place constraints on the body of knowledge formed. Therefore, this study aimed to utilise a relatively new, in-domain, practitioner-centred methodology called analytic autoethnography, to study perioperative work from a joint cognitive systems theoretical perspective. This was done by an anaesthesiologist practitioner-researcher analysing situations of concern to him in his own work contexts. Findings yielded a number of categories of adaptive and maladaptive strategies and conditions, including some that have not previously been described, potentially opening a number of new research spaces. To better describe and account for the studied situations and adaptations, conceptual categories of joint cognitive systems theory were broadened to include a modified and extended group of constructs from a symbolic interactionism framework, these constructs being: artifacts, naturifacts, mentifacts, and sociofacts. A focal conceptualisation of ‘power’ that could better describe power relationships across joint cognitive system objects was also developed. Under this conceptualisation, a reformulation of cognitive systems engineering aims was suggested. This included that research would seek to understand power relationships amongst symbolic objects in sociotechnical systems, with interventions subsequently designed for the purposes of modifying objects, and hence their power relationships, in order to support cognitive work.},
  author       = {Motavalli, Al},
  keyword      = {human factors,symbolic interactionism,power,anesthesia,perioperative,autoethnography,joint cognitive systems,cognitive systems engineering,FLMU06},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {What perioperative situations are concerning to an anaesthesiologist, and what are some of the related joint cognitive system adaptations?},
  year         = {2016},
}