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Migration in the internet age: The 21st century: When refugees went online

Lif, Oskar LU (2016) STVK02 20161
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This paper provides a new take on how to explain irregular migration. The results of this study takes a leap forward in scientific thinking of how larger irregular migration flows can be understood in the modern age where migrants are using internet technology to their advantage. By using existing migration theory and big data search patterns from google a completely new way of understanding irregular migration is developed. This longitudinal quantitative cross-country study gives new analytical insight in how irregular migration can be explained by analysing potential and actual migrant’s internet behaviour. This paper is the first of its kind to use Google search patterns as a determinant for where and when migrants journey by combining... (More)
This paper provides a new take on how to explain irregular migration. The results of this study takes a leap forward in scientific thinking of how larger irregular migration flows can be understood in the modern age where migrants are using internet technology to their advantage. By using existing migration theory and big data search patterns from google a completely new way of understanding irregular migration is developed. This longitudinal quantitative cross-country study gives new analytical insight in how irregular migration can be explained by analysing potential and actual migrant’s internet behaviour. This paper is the first of its kind to use Google search patterns as a determinant for where and when migrants journey by combining it with time series of number of asylum seekers yielding successful ways to predict large irregular migration. Data from eight different receiving countries and Europe as whole is used in combination with data from two transit countries and five sender countries. It’s argued that to understand the ‘Age of migration’ we must see how it relates to the ‘Information age’ and that these two global phenomena must be seen in connection and not as separate from each other if we are to understand modern migration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Lif, Oskar LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK02 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Irregular-migration, Internet, Search-patterns, Google, Network
language
English
id
8873467
date added to LUP
2016-06-17 11:51:33
date last changed
2016-06-17 11:51:33
@misc{8873467,
  abstract     = {This paper provides a new take on how to explain irregular migration. The results of this study takes a leap forward in scientific thinking of how larger irregular migration flows can be understood in the modern age where migrants are using internet technology to their advantage. By using existing migration theory and big data search patterns from google a completely new way of understanding irregular migration is developed. This longitudinal quantitative cross-country study gives new analytical insight in how irregular migration can be explained by analysing potential and actual migrant’s internet behaviour. This paper is the first of its kind to use Google search patterns as a determinant for where and when migrants journey by combining it with time series of number of asylum seekers yielding successful ways to predict large irregular migration. Data from eight different receiving countries and Europe as whole is used in combination with data from two transit countries and five sender countries. It’s argued that to understand the ‘Age of migration’ we must see how it relates to the ‘Information age’ and that these two global phenomena must be seen in connection and not as separate from each other if we are to understand modern migration.},
  author       = {Lif, Oskar},
  keyword      = {Irregular-migration,Internet,Search-patterns,Google,Network},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Migration in the internet age: The 21st century: When refugees went online},
  year         = {2016},
}