Advanced

Ontologies of Indigeneity: the Dis-indigenization of Sámi Identity through Legal Discourse

Djuanvat, Youstbi LU (2016) RÄSM02 20161
Department of Sociology of Law
Abstract
Through government proposition 1976/77:80, Sámi people in Sweden was formally declared as indigenous people by the Swedish national parliament in 1977. Nevertheless, to this day Sámi in Sweden do not acquire indigenous rights that are conferred per international legal standard, i.e., self-determination and land rights. Historically, Swedish legislations has been refusing and prolonging Sámi people their rights. This is done by various assimilation policies as well as by categorizing them as something other than an indigenous group (dis-indigenization process). This convolution of the ontology of Sámi in Sweden is done through the discourse of laws. In this sense, the state—through its agencies—proposes a Sámi legal ontology absent of its... (More)
Through government proposition 1976/77:80, Sámi people in Sweden was formally declared as indigenous people by the Swedish national parliament in 1977. Nevertheless, to this day Sámi in Sweden do not acquire indigenous rights that are conferred per international legal standard, i.e., self-determination and land rights. Historically, Swedish legislations has been refusing and prolonging Sámi people their rights. This is done by various assimilation policies as well as by categorizing them as something other than an indigenous group (dis-indigenization process). This convolution of the ontology of Sámi in Sweden is done through the discourse of laws. In this sense, the state—through its agencies—proposes a Sámi legal ontology absent of its indigeneity. This paper will examine such dis-indigenization process through discourse analysis with specific focus on Swedish statutory codes 2009:600 and 2009:724. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Djuanvat, Youstbi LU
supervisor
organization
course
RÄSM02 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Sociology of Law, Legal language, Sami, Legal ontology, Indigenous identity
language
English
id
8874719
date added to LUP
2016-06-21 13:59:44
date last changed
2016-10-13 14:33:05
@misc{8874719,
  abstract     = {Through government proposition 1976/77:80, Sámi people in Sweden was formally declared as indigenous people by the Swedish national parliament in 1977. Nevertheless, to this day Sámi in Sweden do not acquire indigenous rights that are conferred per international legal standard, i.e., self-determination and land rights. Historically, Swedish legislations has been refusing and prolonging Sámi people their rights. This is done by various assimilation policies as well as by categorizing them as something other than an indigenous group (dis-indigenization process). This convolution of the ontology of Sámi in Sweden is done through the discourse of laws. In this sense, the state—through its agencies—proposes a Sámi legal ontology absent of its indigeneity. This paper will examine such dis-indigenization process through discourse analysis with specific focus on Swedish statutory codes 2009:600 and 2009:724.},
  author       = {Djuanvat, Youstbi},
  keyword      = {Sociology of Law,Legal language,Sami,Legal ontology,Indigenous identity},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Ontologies of Indigeneity: the Dis-indigenization of Sámi Identity through Legal Discourse},
  year         = {2016},
}