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The Perfect Fit - Development process for the use of 3D technology in the manufacturing of custom-made prosthetic arm sockets

Strömshed, Emelie LU (2016) MMK920 20161
Product Development
Abstract
This report describes the development of a manufacturing process for creating custom-made prosthetic arm sockets using 3D scanning and 3D printing. The process is intended to function as a guide for a prosthetist without requiring an extensive experience in CAD. The project aims to offer a viable alternative to the often time consuming and manual labour-intensive conventional manufacturing method, as well as to provide amputee patients with perfectly fitted prosthetic sockets.
Prior to initiating the process development, a thorough pre-study was performed in order to gain an understanding of both the medical and technical aspects concerning the project.
The first development phase involved performing a user study to determine what was... (More)
This report describes the development of a manufacturing process for creating custom-made prosthetic arm sockets using 3D scanning and 3D printing. The process is intended to function as a guide for a prosthetist without requiring an extensive experience in CAD. The project aims to offer a viable alternative to the often time consuming and manual labour-intensive conventional manufacturing method, as well as to provide amputee patients with perfectly fitted prosthetic sockets.
Prior to initiating the process development, a thorough pre-study was performed in order to gain an understanding of both the medical and technical aspects concerning the project.
The first development phase involved performing a user study to determine what was required from the new process both from a user and a patient perspective. Findings from the user study were then converted into process requirements to be used as guidelines in the further development.
A main structure for the process was then established based on the generic approach to create products using 3D scanning and 3D printing. To adapt the process to creating a prosthetic socket, the key focus was to evaluate and select an appropriate software and modelling method that also would align with the process requirements.
By creating socket prototypes, both quality and design could be assessed together with the user. After minor adjustments, case studies involving two patients were conducted, which resulted in a successful validation of the process.
The final process offers the possibility to produce both passive and myoelectric sockets. It consists of seven main steps, each with their own set of substeps. The majority of these substeps are core activities performed regardless of the type of socket to be created, whereas a handful of substeps are added to the process when creating a myoelectric socket or applying a pattern.
In the final phase, learning material was elaborated in order to facilitate a possible implementation of the process. A time and cost comparison was also performed and showed time savings of 400 h/year and cost reductions of up to 60 %, corresponding to 261 000 SEK/year by using the new process. (Less)
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author
Strömshed, Emelie LU
supervisor
organization
course
MMK920 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Process development, amputation, prosthetic socket, 3D printing, 3D scanning
language
English
id
8875364
date added to LUP
2016-05-30 08:18:52
date last changed
2016-05-30 08:18:52
@misc{8875364,
  abstract     = {This report describes the development of a manufacturing process for creating custom-made prosthetic arm sockets using 3D scanning and 3D printing. The process is intended to function as a guide for a prosthetist without requiring an extensive experience in CAD. The project aims to offer a viable alternative to the often time consuming and manual labour-intensive conventional manufacturing method, as well as to provide amputee patients with perfectly fitted prosthetic sockets.
Prior to initiating the process development, a thorough pre-study was performed in order to gain an understanding of both the medical and technical aspects concerning the project.
The first development phase involved performing a user study to determine what was required from the new process both from a user and a patient perspective. Findings from the user study were then converted into process requirements to be used as guidelines in the further development. 
A main structure for the process was then established based on the generic approach to create products using 3D scanning and 3D printing. To adapt the process to creating a prosthetic socket, the key focus was to evaluate and select an appropriate software and modelling method that also would align with the process requirements. 
By creating socket prototypes, both quality and design could be assessed together with the user. After minor adjustments, case studies involving two patients were conducted, which resulted in a successful validation of the process. 
The final process offers the possibility to produce both passive and myoelectric sockets. It consists of seven main steps, each with their own set of substeps. The majority of these substeps are core activities performed regardless of the type of socket to be created, whereas a handful of substeps are added to the process when creating a myoelectric socket or applying a pattern. 
In the final phase, learning material was elaborated in order to facilitate a possible implementation of the process. A time and cost comparison was also performed and showed time savings of 400 h/year and cost reductions of up to 60 %, corresponding to 261 000 SEK/year by using the new process.},
  author       = {Strömshed, Emelie},
  keyword      = {Process development,amputation,prosthetic socket,3D printing,3D scanning},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Perfect Fit - Development process for the use of 3D technology in the manufacturing of custom-made prosthetic arm sockets},
  year         = {2016},
}