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Investigating the Significance of Inflammatory Signaling in Fetal and Adult Hematopoiesis

Jassinskaja, Maria LU (2016) KBK820 20161
Pure and Applied Biochemistry
Abstract
A specific class of signaling proteins has been shown to affect adult hematopoiesis in mice, but little is known about the role that these proteins play during hematopoiesis in the fetal liver of the embryo. Here, we have studied and compared the in vitro and in vivo response to a cytokine in bone marrow and fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). We have found that fetal liver HSPCs are sensitive to this cytokine and that the in vitro response to stimulation resembles that in the adult. In vivo however, stimulation with the cytokine results in a response in the fetal liver HSPCs that differs from that observed in the adult. Our study has provided further insight into what factors affect and regulate the functional... (More)
A specific class of signaling proteins has been shown to affect adult hematopoiesis in mice, but little is known about the role that these proteins play during hematopoiesis in the fetal liver of the embryo. Here, we have studied and compared the in vitro and in vivo response to a cytokine in bone marrow and fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). We have found that fetal liver HSPCs are sensitive to this cytokine and that the in vitro response to stimulation resembles that in the adult. In vivo however, stimulation with the cytokine results in a response in the fetal liver HSPCs that differs from that observed in the adult. Our study has provided further insight into what factors affect and regulate the functional differences between adult and fetal HSPCs. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Eliciting all aspects of early blood cell development is crucial for understanding why certain diseases, such as blood cell cancers, arise, and why children and adults have different susceptibility to them. We have studied how a type of inflammatory signaling molecules affect the key players of blood cell development, the blood stem cells, in the developing embryo and found that the embryonic blood stem cells respond differently than their adult counterpart.

Blood cell development begins early in the mouse embryo. The blood stem cells that later will give rise to all the components of the blood system mature gradually as they migrate through different tissues in the developing embryo (fetus). The main site of blood cell development in... (More)
Eliciting all aspects of early blood cell development is crucial for understanding why certain diseases, such as blood cell cancers, arise, and why children and adults have different susceptibility to them. We have studied how a type of inflammatory signaling molecules affect the key players of blood cell development, the blood stem cells, in the developing embryo and found that the embryonic blood stem cells respond differently than their adult counterpart.

Blood cell development begins early in the mouse embryo. The blood stem cells that later will give rise to all the components of the blood system mature gradually as they migrate through different tissues in the developing embryo (fetus). The main site of blood cell development in the embryo is the fetal liver. From there, the blood stem cells move on to populate the bone marrow, where blood development is sustained after birth and throughout the lifetime of the animal. Blood cell development in the adult and fetus differ from each other in several aspects. The signals and pathways that give rise to the different properties are as of yet not fully understood, and neither are the consequences of these differences in terms of development of different blood diseases. When our group studied the molecular equipment of immature blood cells, we discovered that many molecules related to a type of inflammatory signaling are present at much lower levels or altogether absent in the fetal cells when compared to the adult. Inflammatory signaling pathways are activated when the body is infected with viruses or bacteria to help the immune system combat these potential threats. Although there have been studies on how inflammatory signaling affects adult blood cell development, little is known about what role it plays during blood cell development in the embryo.

We have found that embryonic blood stem cells are exposed to inflammatory signaling molecules and that they, surprisingly, can respond to stimulation by these proteins, despite lacking a big part of the machinery needed to generate a response. When the immature blood cells are taken out from the bone marrow or fetal liver of the mouse and subjected to inflammatory molecules outside of the animal’s body, the response is similar for the adult and fetal cells. However, if an inflammation is induced by injecting the mouse with a compound that mimics a viral infection, the response to inflammatory signaling in the fetal blood stem cells differs from that in the adult cells. Although a lot of work remains in terms of figuring out the mechanism behind the response, our study has provided further insight into one of the many factors that may regulate the functional differences between fetal and adult blood stem cells. These findings also give us a better understanding of what affects the blood cell development in the embryo and the consequences this may have for future life and susceptibility to blood cell cancers. (Less)
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author
Jassinskaja, Maria LU
supervisor
organization
course
KBK820 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
applied biochemistry, tillämpad biokemi
language
English
id
8876329
date added to LUP
2016-06-17 16:53:28
date last changed
2016-06-17 16:53:28
@misc{8876329,
  abstract     = {A specific class of signaling proteins has been shown to affect adult hematopoiesis in mice, but little is known about the role that these proteins play during hematopoiesis in the fetal liver of the embryo. Here, we have studied and compared the in vitro and in vivo response to a cytokine in bone marrow and fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). We have found that fetal liver HSPCs are sensitive to this cytokine and that the in vitro response to stimulation resembles that in the adult. In vivo however, stimulation with the cytokine results in a response in the fetal liver HSPCs that differs from that observed in the adult. Our study has provided further insight into what factors affect and regulate the functional differences between adult and fetal HSPCs.},
  author       = {Jassinskaja, Maria},
  keyword      = {applied biochemistry,tillämpad biokemi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Investigating the Significance of Inflammatory Signaling in Fetal and Adult Hematopoiesis},
  year         = {2016},
}