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Museum of Intangible Artworks : Revisiting the relationship between the image and the observer

Moustakli, Foteini LU (2016) KOVM12 20161
Division of Art History and Visual Studies
Abstract
The thesis focuses on the evolving relationship between art and its reproduction in the digital age on the one hand, and the contemporary observer on the other. The research focuses on art reproduction by means of virtual reality (VR) techniques, and delves into the history of art reproduction from antiquity to modern methods. It adopts a phenomenological approach, scrutinizing two case studies: RecoVR: Mosul, a Collective Reconstruction and the Museum of Stolen Art, two virtualized museum projects which concern the ISIL’s destruction of the Mosul Museum, and European paintings that are lost, stolen, or destroyed; respectively. The thesis employs the concept Lebenswelt, or life-world, which refers to personal experience. This first-hand... (More)
The thesis focuses on the evolving relationship between art and its reproduction in the digital age on the one hand, and the contemporary observer on the other. The research focuses on art reproduction by means of virtual reality (VR) techniques, and delves into the history of art reproduction from antiquity to modern methods. It adopts a phenomenological approach, scrutinizing two case studies: RecoVR: Mosul, a Collective Reconstruction and the Museum of Stolen Art, two virtualized museum projects which concern the ISIL’s destruction of the Mosul Museum, and European paintings that are lost, stolen, or destroyed; respectively. The thesis employs the concept Lebenswelt, or life-world, which refers to personal experience. This first-hand approach is bolstered by a three-context model method of museologists John Falk and Lynn Dierking, who explain the museum visitors’ process of obtaining knowledge under personal, physical and social contexts. Last but not least, Hans Gumbrecht’s theory on production of presence, which argues that there exists a separation between presence culture vs meaning culture, is used as a theoretical framework in order to understand how presence is understood in a VR exhibition. The thesis will benefit from the three characteristics that produce presence, as identified by Gumbrecht, namely presentification, epiphany, and deixis.
VR creates visual events by restricting the capacity of the observer to imagine and therefore learn. The freedom of perception is also limited as VR scenarios deliver a readymade illusion. However, the capability of manipulating images, especially in the context of museums, allow these technologies to be used for a number of objectives. In this light, the thesis argues that digital reproduction in immersive environments can be a useful as a particularly pedagogical visual aid. (Less)
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author
Moustakli, Foteini LU
supervisor
organization
course
KOVM12 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Digital, Virtual, Art reproduction, Knowledge, Presence, Museum
language
English
id
8877112
date added to LUP
2016-10-10 08:11:05
date last changed
2016-10-10 08:11:05
@misc{8877112,
  abstract     = {The thesis focuses on the evolving relationship between art and its reproduction in the digital age on the one hand, and the contemporary observer on the other. The research focuses on art reproduction by means of virtual reality (VR) techniques, and delves into the history of art reproduction from antiquity to modern methods. It adopts a phenomenological approach, scrutinizing two case studies: RecoVR: Mosul, a Collective Reconstruction and the Museum of Stolen Art, two virtualized museum projects which concern the ISIL’s destruction of the Mosul Museum, and European paintings that are lost, stolen, or destroyed; respectively. The thesis employs the concept Lebenswelt, or life-world, which refers to personal experience. This first-hand approach is bolstered by a three-context model method of museologists John Falk and Lynn Dierking, who explain the museum visitors’ process of obtaining knowledge under personal, physical and social contexts. Last but not least, Hans Gumbrecht’s theory on production of presence, which argues that there exists a separation between presence culture vs meaning culture, is used as a theoretical framework in order to understand how presence is understood in a VR exhibition. The thesis will benefit from the three characteristics that produce presence, as identified by Gumbrecht, namely presentification, epiphany, and deixis.
VR creates visual events by restricting the capacity of the observer to imagine and therefore learn. The freedom of perception is also limited as VR scenarios deliver a readymade illusion. However, the capability of manipulating images, especially in the context of museums, allow these technologies to be used for a number of objectives. In this light, the thesis argues that digital reproduction in immersive environments can be a useful as a particularly pedagogical visual aid.},
  author       = {Moustakli, Foteini},
  keyword      = {Digital,Virtual,Art reproduction,Knowledge,Presence,Museum},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Museum of Intangible Artworks : Revisiting the relationship between the image and the observer},
  year         = {2016},
}