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“Come Hell or High Water”: A Comparative Analysis of Policy Frames surrounding Adaptation Strategies of Climate-affected Pacific Island Countries

Goffi, Elizabeth LU (2016) STVK12 20161
Department of Political Science
Abstract
While mildly disruptive to the developed world, climate change represents an existential threat to the Pacific Island Countries. Indigenous communities have been consistently recognized as especially vulnerable due to their low adaptive capacity and cultural reliance on the environment. Many critical and post-colonial theorists argue that this due to environmental colonialism. The purpose of this research was to explore how different institutional settings understood Pacific climate change adaptation. A Critical Frame Analysis of the UNDP’s Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change Programme and the Pacific Forum Leaders’ Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change revealed significant differences in how Pacific-based and global... (More)
While mildly disruptive to the developed world, climate change represents an existential threat to the Pacific Island Countries. Indigenous communities have been consistently recognized as especially vulnerable due to their low adaptive capacity and cultural reliance on the environment. Many critical and post-colonial theorists argue that this due to environmental colonialism. The purpose of this research was to explore how different institutional settings understood Pacific climate change adaptation. A Critical Frame Analysis of the UNDP’s Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change Programme and the Pacific Forum Leaders’ Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change revealed significant differences in how Pacific-based and global institutions view climate change adaptation. Analyzed through Critical Social Constructivism, the main findings were that the two documents were similar in framing focus, but, when the PACC preserved the status-quo, the PIFACC made small, but important strides in promoting climate justice through paths to alternative development structures. (Less)
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author
Goffi, Elizabeth LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Climate Change Adaptation, Pacific Island Countries, Indigenous Communities, Environmental Colonialism, Climate Justice
language
English
id
8878454
date added to LUP
2016-06-22 13:40:42
date last changed
2016-06-22 13:40:42
@misc{8878454,
  abstract     = {While mildly disruptive to the developed world, climate change represents an existential threat to the Pacific Island Countries. Indigenous communities have been consistently recognized as especially vulnerable due to their low adaptive capacity and cultural reliance on the environment. Many critical and post-colonial theorists argue that this due to environmental colonialism. The purpose of this research was to explore how different institutional settings understood Pacific climate change adaptation. A Critical Frame Analysis of the UNDP’s Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change Programme and the Pacific Forum Leaders’ Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change revealed significant differences in how Pacific-based and global institutions view climate change adaptation. Analyzed through Critical Social Constructivism, the main findings were that the two documents were similar in framing focus, but, when the PACC preserved the status-quo, the PIFACC made small, but important strides in promoting climate justice through paths to alternative development structures.},
  author       = {Goffi, Elizabeth},
  keyword      = {Climate Change Adaptation,Pacific Island Countries,Indigenous Communities,Environmental Colonialism,Climate Justice},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {“Come Hell or High Water”: A Comparative Analysis of Policy Frames surrounding Adaptation Strategies of Climate-affected Pacific Island Countries},
  year         = {2016},
}