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Silencing the Subaltern: A Postcolonial Critique of NGO-run Orphanages in Jinja, Uganda

De Wet, Louisa LU (2016) SIMV29 20161
Department of Political Science
Graduate School
Abstract
The large number of orphanages in Jinja, Uganda has promoted the widespread institutionalisation of children from poor families. Parents are left disempowered and have very few options but to sign over the rights of their children because NGOs in the region have largely prioritised orphanage care over other services. This paper critically analyses the failure of non-state actors in addressing the underlying causes of poverty and thus failing to empower parents to care for their own children. Through in-depth interviews with Ugandan social workers and NGO staff I have identified the main driving factors that push parents towards institutionalising their children. Using a Postcolonial theoretical framework, I have been able to highlight the... (More)
The large number of orphanages in Jinja, Uganda has promoted the widespread institutionalisation of children from poor families. Parents are left disempowered and have very few options but to sign over the rights of their children because NGOs in the region have largely prioritised orphanage care over other services. This paper critically analyses the failure of non-state actors in addressing the underlying causes of poverty and thus failing to empower parents to care for their own children. Through in-depth interviews with Ugandan social workers and NGO staff I have identified the main driving factors that push parents towards institutionalising their children. Using a Postcolonial theoretical framework, I have been able to highlight the structural problems enforced by NGO actors that contribute to the further marginalisation of poor Ugandans. Currently, faith-based organisations are at the forefront of promoting orphanage use in Jinja. Whilst their contribution to development cannot be denied, many of their practices are upholding colonial dependencies and values. The findings of this paper conclude that orphanages are disempowering locals because they fail to address the root causes of poverty. (Less)
Popular Abstract
The large number of orphanages in Jinja, Uganda has promoted the widespread institutionalisation of children from poor families. Parents are left disempowered and have very few options but to sign over the rights of their children because NGOs in the region have largely prioritised orphanage care over other services. This paper critically analyses the failure of non-state actors in addressing the underlying causes of poverty and thus failing to empower parents to care for their own children. Through in-depth interviews with Ugandan social workers and NGO staff I have identified the main driving factors that push parents towards institutionalising their children. Using a Postcolonial theoretical framework, I have been able to highlight the... (More)
The large number of orphanages in Jinja, Uganda has promoted the widespread institutionalisation of children from poor families. Parents are left disempowered and have very few options but to sign over the rights of their children because NGOs in the region have largely prioritised orphanage care over other services. This paper critically analyses the failure of non-state actors in addressing the underlying causes of poverty and thus failing to empower parents to care for their own children. Through in-depth interviews with Ugandan social workers and NGO staff I have identified the main driving factors that push parents towards institutionalising their children. Using a Postcolonial theoretical framework, I have been able to highlight the structural problems enforced by NGO actors that contribute to the further marginalisation of poor Ugandans. Currently, faith-based organisations are at the forefront of promoting orphanage use in Jinja. Whilst their contribution to development cannot be denied, many of their practices are upholding colonial dependencies and values. The findings of this paper conclude that orphanages are disempowering locals because they fail to address the root causes of poverty. (Less)
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author
De Wet, Louisa LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV29 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Uganda, NGOs, orphanage, disempowerment, corruption, faith-based organisations, weak states, racism, white privilege, subaltern, postcolonialism
language
English
id
8881816
date added to LUP
2016-09-29 16:01:56
date last changed
2016-09-29 16:01:56
@misc{8881816,
  abstract     = {The large number of orphanages in Jinja, Uganda has promoted the widespread institutionalisation of children from poor families. Parents are left disempowered and have very few options but to sign over the rights of their children because NGOs in the region have largely prioritised orphanage care over other services. This paper critically analyses the failure of non-state actors in addressing the underlying causes of poverty and thus failing to empower parents to care for their own children. Through in-depth interviews with Ugandan social workers and NGO staff I have identified the main driving factors that push parents towards institutionalising their children. Using a Postcolonial theoretical framework, I have been able to highlight the structural problems enforced by NGO actors that contribute to the further marginalisation of poor Ugandans. Currently, faith-based organisations are at the forefront of promoting orphanage use in Jinja. Whilst their contribution to development cannot be denied, many of their practices are upholding colonial dependencies and values. The findings of this paper conclude that orphanages are disempowering locals because they fail to address the root causes of poverty.},
  author       = {De Wet, Louisa},
  keyword      = {Uganda,NGOs,orphanage,disempowerment,corruption,faith-based organisations,weak states,racism,white privilege,subaltern,postcolonialism},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Silencing the Subaltern: A Postcolonial Critique of NGO-run Orphanages in Jinja, Uganda},
  year         = {2016},
}