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Charitable Program Clustering in Canada: A quantitative analysis using T3010 responses

Swan, Sarah LU (2016) EKHM52 20161
Department of Economic History
Abstract
There is a lot of research dedicated to understanding what makes firms successful, and that research has expanded to take on a systemic approach. Most developed nations are implementing some sort of cluster policy and firms in clusters are well known to perform better than their counterparts. This thesis suggests we borrow practises used to understand firms, to better understand nonprofit organizations. Many of the influences firms receive from being in clusters can be applicable to nonprofit originations as well. Applying research and current practise used to map and quantitatively identify business clusters, responses from the T3010 tax return of registered charities across Canada was used to investigate for evidence of nonprofit... (More)
There is a lot of research dedicated to understanding what makes firms successful, and that research has expanded to take on a systemic approach. Most developed nations are implementing some sort of cluster policy and firms in clusters are well known to perform better than their counterparts. This thesis suggests we borrow practises used to understand firms, to better understand nonprofit organizations. Many of the influences firms receive from being in clusters can be applicable to nonprofit originations as well. Applying research and current practise used to map and quantitatively identify business clusters, responses from the T3010 tax return of registered charities across Canada was used to investigate for evidence of nonprofit clustering. (Less)
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author
Swan, Sarah LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHM52 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
nonprofit innovation, clusters, Porter, cluster identification, cluster mapping, knowledge transfer, Regional Systems, community development
language
English
id
8884248
date added to LUP
2016-06-22 13:32:25
date last changed
2016-06-22 13:32:25
@misc{8884248,
  abstract     = {There is a lot of research dedicated to understanding what makes firms successful, and that research has expanded to take on a systemic approach. Most developed nations are implementing some sort of cluster policy and firms in clusters are well known to perform better than their counterparts. This thesis suggests we borrow practises used to understand firms, to better understand nonprofit organizations. Many of the influences firms receive from being in clusters can be applicable to nonprofit originations as well. Applying research and current practise used to map and quantitatively identify business clusters, responses from the T3010 tax return of registered charities across Canada was used to investigate for evidence of nonprofit clustering.},
  author       = {Swan, Sarah},
  keyword      = {nonprofit innovation,clusters,Porter,cluster identification,cluster mapping,knowledge transfer,Regional Systems,community development},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Charitable Program Clustering in Canada: A quantitative analysis using T3010 responses},
  year         = {2016},
}