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Female Genital Mutilation in Senegal The role of Socio-Economic Risk Factors of Circumcision and Subsequent Effects of Circumcision upon Fertility and Marriage Markets

Austen, James LU (2016) EKHM52 20161
Department of Economic History
Abstract (Swedish)
Female Genital Mutilation is widespread in sub- Saharan Africa despite being illegal in many countries. It has been shown in previous research that female genital mutilation occurs due to long standing tradition which creates difficulty in the elimination of the practice. In any case, the effects of mutilation can have long lasting effects on future demographics through impacts on future fertility and marriage markets. This study looks to identify socio-economic risk factors that can increase the risk of circumcision of respondent first daughters in Senegal suing Demographic Health Survey data.  Marriage Markets are affected through a number of channels due to the existence of female genital mutilation. For example, circumcision is... (More)
Female Genital Mutilation is widespread in sub- Saharan Africa despite being illegal in many countries. It has been shown in previous research that female genital mutilation occurs due to long standing tradition which creates difficulty in the elimination of the practice. In any case, the effects of mutilation can have long lasting effects on future demographics through impacts on future fertility and marriage markets. This study looks to identify socio-economic risk factors that can increase the risk of circumcision of respondent first daughters in Senegal suing Demographic Health Survey data.  Marriage Markets are affected through a number of channels due to the existence of female genital mutilation. For example, circumcision is associated with preparation for marriage reducing the age of marriages within populations. Furthermore, female circumcision can be used as a mechanism of control for women under the male dominated household, causing circumcision status to effect potential value on the marriage market assuming men supposedly make rational decisions when choosing a wife. Additionally, the practice can have negative impacts on female health, leading to the assumption that fertility will be negatively affected. Literature on the subject of female circumcision is growing, however few address the issue in relation to economic theories of circumcision. Likewise, much of the quantitative literature on female circumcision disregard the severity of circumcision. This paper attempts to link the severity of circumcision to fertility impacts through measurement of birth parity spacing and total births. (Less)
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author
Austen, James LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHM52 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8889414
date added to LUP
2016-09-19 13:33:55
date last changed
2016-09-19 13:33:55
@misc{8889414,
  abstract     = {Female Genital Mutilation is widespread in sub- Saharan Africa despite being illegal in many countries. It has been shown in previous research that female genital mutilation occurs due to long standing tradition which creates difficulty in the elimination of the practice. In any case, the effects of mutilation can have long lasting effects on future demographics through impacts on future fertility and marriage markets. This study looks to identify socio-economic risk factors that can increase the risk of circumcision of respondent first daughters in Senegal suing Demographic Health Survey data.  Marriage Markets are affected through a number of channels due to the existence of female genital mutilation. For example, circumcision is associated with preparation for marriage reducing the age of marriages within populations. Furthermore, female circumcision can be used as a mechanism of control for women under the male dominated household, causing circumcision status to effect potential value on the marriage market assuming men supposedly make rational decisions when choosing a wife. Additionally, the practice can have negative impacts on female health, leading to the assumption that fertility will be negatively affected. Literature on the subject of female circumcision is growing, however few address the issue in relation to economic theories of circumcision. Likewise, much of the quantitative literature on female circumcision disregard the severity of circumcision. This paper attempts to link the severity of circumcision to fertility impacts through measurement of birth parity spacing and total births.},
  author       = {Austen, James},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Female Genital Mutilation in Senegal The role of Socio-Economic Risk Factors of Circumcision and Subsequent Effects of Circumcision upon Fertility and Marriage Markets},
  year         = {2016},
}