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Public Perceptions of Street Children in Cairo: The Criminalization of Street Children and the Role of the Public

Göthe, Rebecca LU (2016) SIMV29 20161
Department of Political Science
Graduate School
Abstract (Swedish)
The present study seeks to explore the criminalization of, and punitive responses toward poor and marginalized people, through a case study on street children in Cairo. The specific focus of the study is public perceptions of the street children. Through focus group discussions with Cairo residents of different ages, gender and socioeconomic backgrounds, it explores how members of the public understand the causes and solutions for the issue, as well as their view on who bears responsibility in relation to it. In-depth interviews with representatives from NGOs working with street children also provide an additional perspective on the public perceptions. The findings are analyzed through a theoretical framework focused on individualistic and... (More)
The present study seeks to explore the criminalization of, and punitive responses toward poor and marginalized people, through a case study on street children in Cairo. The specific focus of the study is public perceptions of the street children. Through focus group discussions with Cairo residents of different ages, gender and socioeconomic backgrounds, it explores how members of the public understand the causes and solutions for the issue, as well as their view on who bears responsibility in relation to it. In-depth interviews with representatives from NGOs working with street children also provide an additional perspective on the public perceptions. The findings are analyzed through a theoretical framework focused on individualistic and structural perspectives on crime and poverty, two broader topics that the issue of street children relate to. They are furthermore assessed in relation to the criminalizing approach adopted by the Egyptian state toward street children. The study reveals that members of the public have complex perceptions of street children, often adopting both individualistic and structural perspectives. Representations of street children as ‘criminals’, ‘victims’ and ‘cheaters’ could be identified in the participants’ narratives. The study concludes that their perceptions both challenge and, in effect, reinforce the approach of the state. It is argued that the combined effects of public stigmatization and repressive responses by the state reinforce the marginalization and vulnerability of street children, and will impact negatively on Egypt’s democratic development. (Less)
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author
Göthe, Rebecca LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV29 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
street children, criminalization, public opinion, public perceptions, Egypt
language
English
id
8890958
date added to LUP
2016-09-29 15:59:26
date last changed
2016-09-29 15:59:26
@misc{8890958,
  abstract     = {The present study seeks to explore the criminalization of, and punitive responses toward poor and marginalized people, through a case study on street children in Cairo. The specific focus of the study is public perceptions of the street children. Through focus group discussions with Cairo residents of different ages, gender and socioeconomic backgrounds, it explores how members of the public understand the causes and solutions for the issue, as well as their view on who bears responsibility in relation to it. In-depth interviews with representatives from NGOs working with street children also provide an additional perspective on the public perceptions. The findings are analyzed through a theoretical framework focused on individualistic and structural perspectives on crime and poverty, two broader topics that the issue of street children relate to. They are furthermore assessed in relation to the criminalizing approach adopted by the Egyptian state toward street children. The study reveals that members of the public have complex perceptions of street children, often adopting both individualistic and structural perspectives. Representations of street children as ‘criminals’, ‘victims’ and ‘cheaters’ could be identified in the participants’ narratives. The study concludes that their perceptions both challenge and, in effect, reinforce the approach of the state. It is argued that the combined effects of public stigmatization and repressive responses by the state reinforce the marginalization and vulnerability of street children, and will impact negatively on Egypt’s democratic development.},
  author       = {Göthe, Rebecca},
  keyword      = {street children,criminalization,public opinion,public perceptions,Egypt},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Public Perceptions of Street Children in Cairo: The Criminalization of Street Children and the Role of the Public},
  year         = {2016},
}