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Development of a droplet-based microfluidic platform for high efficiency single cell encapsulation

Issleib, Constantin LU (2016) KBKM01 20162
Pure and Applied Biochemistry
Abstract
Microfluidic applications nowadays have become of great interest due to their broad compatibility especially in biological applications, and one of them being droplet-based cell encapsulation. Cell encapsulation in droplets is carried out by discretising an aqueous phase (i.e. cell suspension) and including them into a continuous oil phase. This methodology is a potential gateway to high throughput droplet-based cell fusion (e.g. for the production of hybridomas). The challenge here is to achieve a high efficiency of correctly paired cells in a droplet to overcome the random fusion pairing during bulk cell fusion. As such, droplet microfluidics can be used to co-encapsulate a single cell ‘A’ and a single cell ‘B’ cells in one droplet or... (More)
Microfluidic applications nowadays have become of great interest due to their broad compatibility especially in biological applications, and one of them being droplet-based cell encapsulation. Cell encapsulation in droplets is carried out by discretising an aqueous phase (i.e. cell suspension) and including them into a continuous oil phase. This methodology is a potential gateway to high throughput droplet-based cell fusion (e.g. for the production of hybridomas). The challenge here is to achieve a high efficiency of correctly paired cells in a droplet to overcome the random fusion pairing during bulk cell fusion. As such, droplet microfluidics can be used to co-encapsulate a single cell ‘A’ and a single cell ‘B’ cells in one droplet or encapsulate cells separately and merge droplets with desired cell number and type subsequently with other droplet manipulations. In this study, separate encapsulation studies of human B lymphocytes and mouse embryonic stem cells were carried out using a PDMS microfluidic platform and have shown to follow Poisson distribution. Approaches to improve single cell encapsulation prior to coencapsulation have been made by cell alignment studies in the system. Initial studies on coencapsulation of the two cell lines have also been performed. However, further optimisation studies of the method are crucial to enable high throughput single cell encapsulation or co-encapsulation and eventually droplet-based cell fusion. (Less)
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author
Issleib, Constantin LU
supervisor
organization
course
KBKM01 20162
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells, Human B Lymphocytes, Mammalian Cells, Droplet, PDMS, Microfluidics, Chip, Poisson Distribution, Coencapsulation, applied biochemistry, tillämpad biokemi
language
English
id
8894052
date added to LUP
2016-11-14 13:41:34
date last changed
2016-11-14 13:41:34
@misc{8894052,
  abstract     = {Microfluidic applications nowadays have become of great interest due to their broad compatibility especially in biological applications, and one of them being droplet-based cell encapsulation. Cell encapsulation in droplets is carried out by discretising an aqueous phase (i.e. cell suspension) and including them into a continuous oil phase. This methodology is a potential gateway to high throughput droplet-based cell fusion (e.g. for the production of hybridomas). The challenge here is to achieve a high efficiency of correctly paired cells in a droplet to overcome the random fusion pairing during bulk cell fusion. As such, droplet microfluidics can be used to co-encapsulate a single cell ‘A’ and a single cell ‘B’ cells in one droplet or encapsulate cells separately and merge droplets with desired cell number and type subsequently with other droplet manipulations. In this study, separate encapsulation studies of human B lymphocytes and mouse embryonic stem cells were carried out using a PDMS microfluidic platform and have shown to follow Poisson distribution. Approaches to improve single cell encapsulation prior to coencapsulation have been made by cell alignment studies in the system. Initial studies on coencapsulation of the two cell lines have also been performed. However, further optimisation studies of the method are crucial to enable high throughput single cell encapsulation or co-encapsulation and eventually droplet-based cell fusion.},
  author       = {Issleib, Constantin},
  keyword      = {Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells,Human B Lymphocytes,Mammalian Cells,Droplet,PDMS,Microfluidics,Chip,Poisson Distribution,Coencapsulation,applied biochemistry,tillämpad biokemi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Development of a droplet-based microfluidic platform for high efficiency single cell encapsulation},
  year         = {2016},
}