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Reconstructing heads of insect pollinators with micro CT-3D

Odlén, Karin (2016) MOBK01 20161
Degree Projects in Molecular Biology
Abstract
Bees are mostly diurnal insects and rely on their vision to perform daily tasks. Their apposition compound eyes play a big part in regulating vision. To improve our knowledge of how vision functions, we will observe these apposition compound eyes using micro CT. The aim of this report was to compare two different methods of preparing and scanning the bees. The first method uses resin to embed the bee and was performed by our supervisor, in the second method the bees are dried through critical point drying and then glued onto metal pins. Scanning them in 3D will help us learn more about their eyes and other head features. A link has been found between head and eye size; the larger the bee, the bigger the eyes. The dried method can quickly... (More)
Bees are mostly diurnal insects and rely on their vision to perform daily tasks. Their apposition compound eyes play a big part in regulating vision. To improve our knowledge of how vision functions, we will observe these apposition compound eyes using micro CT. The aim of this report was to compare two different methods of preparing and scanning the bees. The first method uses resin to embed the bee and was performed by our supervisor, in the second method the bees are dried through critical point drying and then glued onto metal pins. Scanning them in 3D will help us learn more about their eyes and other head features. A link has been found between head and eye size; the larger the bee, the bigger the eyes. The dried method can quickly prepare samples and perform quantitative analysis using micro CT. Results showed it to be a quick and non-invasive method to analyse exterior morphology. Information on exterior features of the compound eyes can provide future clues through analysing visual angles to identify where the eye sees. This provides an indication of different species visual capabilities and behaviours, and can then be used to design technological objects such as robots. (Less)
Popular Abstract
From Bees to robots

Bees can be thought of as annoying creatures that sting you and make your life harder but did you know these tiny animals actually have quite impressing eyes for their tiny size? How can we use their eyes to develop better robots?

Compound eyes are different to human eyes in the way that, instead of having just one lens in each eye, they can have up to thousands of lenses. Each lens sees in its own direction and produces its own image. They are all then added together like pixels to get a full image so it adds to precision. Bee eyes are usually adapted for daylight conditions since the lenses are very small, not much light can enter so it is hard to see in the dark.

Because of these small lenses, the... (More)
From Bees to robots

Bees can be thought of as annoying creatures that sting you and make your life harder but did you know these tiny animals actually have quite impressing eyes for their tiny size? How can we use their eyes to develop better robots?

Compound eyes are different to human eyes in the way that, instead of having just one lens in each eye, they can have up to thousands of lenses. Each lens sees in its own direction and produces its own image. They are all then added together like pixels to get a full image so it adds to precision. Bee eyes are usually adapted for daylight conditions since the lenses are very small, not much light can enter so it is hard to see in the dark.

Because of these small lenses, the resolution that bees see in is pretty low. This does not mean their vision is not precise. Even though they have small brains, they can still fly accurately and find their food. Bees also have an extra tool to help with vision: ocelli, simple eyes that help in making flying easier.

Insects are being used as models when creating robots. Researchers look at insects´ flying patterns and vision. To be able to use bees as a model for robots, we want to understand more about their flying patterns and to do that we will observe the outside structures of the bee head. In this way, we can get out more information about exactly how they see. In our project we are comparing two ways of preparing the bee heads and we will then scan them into a machine that can scan then so we can obtain 3D images of them into the computer. In the first method, the bees are put in resin while in the second method they are dried and then glued onto toothpicks. Once in 3D, we can look at the different features of the bee such as the eye and the ocelli as well as the antennae. We then compared the length of the different parts between the two methods and between the two species. We found a link between the size of the eye and the size of the head. The bigger the head, the bigger the eye size. The reasons why this occurs could be found in the future and would give us more insight on how the eye is structured. This would in the end help us increase our knowledge and help us create the robots of tomorrow. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Odlén, Karin
supervisor
organization
course
MOBK01 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
English
id
8894227
date added to LUP
2016-10-28 09:34:37
date last changed
2016-10-28 09:34:37
@misc{8894227,
  abstract     = {Bees are mostly diurnal insects and rely on their vision to perform daily tasks. Their apposition compound eyes play a big part in regulating vision. To improve our knowledge of how vision functions, we will observe these apposition compound eyes using micro CT. The aim of this report was to compare two different methods of preparing and scanning the bees. The first method uses resin to embed the bee and was performed by our supervisor, in the second method the bees are dried through critical point drying and then glued onto metal pins. Scanning them in 3D will help us learn more about their eyes and other head features. A link has been found between head and eye size; the larger the bee, the bigger the eyes. The dried method can quickly prepare samples and perform quantitative analysis using micro CT. Results showed it to be a quick and non-invasive method to analyse exterior morphology. Information on exterior features of the compound eyes can provide future clues through analysing visual angles to identify where the eye sees. This provides an indication of different species visual capabilities and behaviours, and can then be used to design technological objects such as robots.},
  author       = {Odlén, Karin},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Reconstructing heads of insect pollinators with micro CT-3D},
  year         = {2016},
}