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Characterization of the ocelli of the migratory Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) in comparison to the non-migratory Turnip moth (Agrotis segetum)

Vaduva, Denis (2016) BION01 20152
Degree Projects in Biology
Abstract
The Bogong and Turnip moths are two species of the genus Agrotis, similar in size, but different in life style. The Bogong moth is a long distance migratory species endemic to Australia, whereas the Turnip moth has a wide spread in Africa, Europe and Asia where it is considered a pest. The ocelli are single-lens eyes of the camera type, whose role is still unknown in many insects, including the studied species. The present study searched for a potential role of these visual organs in these species, by determining the physiological and optical characteristics of the ocelli. Because of their different life styles (migratory vs. non-migratory), we searched to see if any differences are found and if the roles of the ocelli may differ as well.... (More)
The Bogong and Turnip moths are two species of the genus Agrotis, similar in size, but different in life style. The Bogong moth is a long distance migratory species endemic to Australia, whereas the Turnip moth has a wide spread in Africa, Europe and Asia where it is considered a pest. The ocelli are single-lens eyes of the camera type, whose role is still unknown in many insects, including the studied species. The present study searched for a potential role of these visual organs in these species, by determining the physiological and optical characteristics of the ocelli. Because of their different life styles (migratory vs. non-migratory), we searched to see if any differences are found and if the roles of the ocelli may differ as well. In my thesis I have found that these species have two underfocused ocelli placed laterally on the vertex of the head, close to the dorsal margin of the compound eyes and posterior to the antennae. The lenses are smooth with no pronounced asymmetry and astigmatism. The projection fields from the Bogong ocellar neurons are located close to the posterior brain surface, adjacent to the esophageal hole, anterior to the mushroom body calyx and anterior of the central complex. Because of the optical and physiological characteristics of the ocelli, it is probable that they play a role in flight stabilization reflexes although a function as a regulator of the initiation and cessation of diurnal activities, cannot be excluded. (Less)
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author
Vaduva, Denis
supervisor
organization
course
BION01 20152
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8895567
date added to LUP
2016-11-30 15:52:27
date last changed
2016-11-30 15:52:27
@misc{8895567,
  abstract     = {The Bogong and Turnip moths are two species of the genus Agrotis, similar in size, but different in life style. The Bogong moth is a long distance migratory species endemic to Australia, whereas the Turnip moth has a wide spread in Africa, Europe and Asia where it is considered a pest. The ocelli are single-lens eyes of the camera type, whose role is still unknown in many insects, including the studied species. The present study searched for a potential role of these visual organs in these species, by determining the physiological and optical characteristics of the ocelli. Because of their different life styles (migratory vs. non-migratory), we searched to see if any differences are found and if the roles of the ocelli may differ as well. In my thesis I have found that these species have two underfocused ocelli placed laterally on the vertex of the head, close to the dorsal margin of the compound eyes and posterior to the antennae. The lenses are smooth with no pronounced asymmetry and astigmatism. The projection fields from the Bogong ocellar neurons are located close to the posterior brain surface, adjacent to the esophageal hole, anterior to the mushroom body calyx and anterior of the central complex. Because of the optical and physiological characteristics of the ocelli, it is probable that they play a role in flight stabilization reflexes although a function as a regulator of the initiation and cessation of diurnal activities, cannot be excluded.},
  author       = {Vaduva, Denis},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Characterization of the ocelli of the migratory Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) in comparison to the non-migratory Turnip moth (Agrotis segetum)},
  year         = {2016},
}