Advanced

LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE ONSET OF TYPE 2 DIABETES IN THE MALMÖ DIET AND CANCER STUDY COHORT

Mutie, Pascal LU (2016) MPHN40 20161
Social Medicine and Global Health
Abstract
Aims/objectives: The study’s aim was to assess the association between different levels
of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)
and assess the association between socio-economic status (SES) and distribution of
LTPA.
Methods: The study was based on the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study cohort that included
participants aged 44-74 years at enrolment. Demographic and covariate data from the
baseline questionnaire (1991-1996) and outcomes of interest (2014) linking the cohort
data to various medical and population registers was used. LTPA was assessed using a
standard questionnaire as a sum of products of 17 predefined individual activities
(assessed as minutes spent weekly per activity in... (More)
Aims/objectives: The study’s aim was to assess the association between different levels
of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)
and assess the association between socio-economic status (SES) and distribution of
LTPA.
Methods: The study was based on the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study cohort that included
participants aged 44-74 years at enrolment. Demographic and covariate data from the
baseline questionnaire (1991-1996) and outcomes of interest (2014) linking the cohort
data to various medical and population registers was used. LTPA was assessed using a
standard questionnaire as a sum of products of 17 predefined individual activities
(assessed as minutes spent weekly per activity in the previous year) with their intensity
factors (Metabolic Equivalent or MET) and reported as MET-hours per week. Chi-square
test was used to assess the proportions of different socioeconomic groups in the various
LTPA categories and Cox regression utilized to model the association between LTPA and
incidence of T2DM, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, education
level and occupation.
Results: There were significant differences in the distribution of LTPA levels across the
different socioeconomic groups. Moderate LTPA (7.5-15 MET-hours/week) was not
significantly associated with T2DM risk (HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.81-1.05), vigorous (15-25
MET-hours/week) and strenuous (25-50 MET-hours/week) levels of LTPA were
associated with reduced incidence of T2DM (HR=0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.94) and
(HR=0.81,95% CI 0.72-0.91) respectively. LTPA beyond 50 MET-hours/week had no
added benefit (HR=0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96).
Conclusion: The study demonstrated the benefits of different LTPA levels in reducing
the risk of T2DM in the MDC cohort. Moderate activity was not significantly associated
while vigorous activity and above was significantly associated with reduced risk but there
was no added benefit for LTPA beyond 50 MET-hours per week. The amount of LTPA
was significantly related to SES. (Less)
Popular Abstract
This research was conducted to help understand how being active helps prevent diabetes
and also how differently people from different social classes participate in leisure
activities. The research showed that light activity (referred to moderate in the study) was
not effective in preventing diabetes. However, vigorous and strenuous levels of activity
were shown to help prevent diabetes but there was no added benefit of being active above
strenuous levels. Exercise even in little amounts is beneficial to those who are
overweight and obese. Social class affects people’s ability to participate in leisure
activities and a low social class increases one risk to get diabetes. People who smoke or
are former smokers also have a high risk... (More)
This research was conducted to help understand how being active helps prevent diabetes
and also how differently people from different social classes participate in leisure
activities. The research showed that light activity (referred to moderate in the study) was
not effective in preventing diabetes. However, vigorous and strenuous levels of activity
were shown to help prevent diabetes but there was no added benefit of being active above
strenuous levels. Exercise even in little amounts is beneficial to those who are
overweight and obese. Social class affects people’s ability to participate in leisure
activities and a low social class increases one risk to get diabetes. People who smoke or
are former smokers also have a high risk of having diabetes compare to those who have
never smokes. In conclusion, we found that being active is beneficial for health. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Mutie, Pascal LU
supervisor
organization
course
MPHN40 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Leisure time physical activity, type 2 diabetes, prospective cohort
language
English
id
8896168
date added to LUP
2017-01-16 14:41:54
date last changed
2017-10-30 04:07:42
@misc{8896168,
  abstract     = {Aims/objectives: The study’s aim was to assess the association between different levels
of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)
and assess the association between socio-economic status (SES) and distribution of
LTPA.
Methods: The study was based on the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study cohort that included
participants aged 44-74 years at enrolment. Demographic and covariate data from the
baseline questionnaire (1991-1996) and outcomes of interest (2014) linking the cohort
data to various medical and population registers was used. LTPA was assessed using a
standard questionnaire as a sum of products of 17 predefined individual activities
(assessed as minutes spent weekly per activity in the previous year) with their intensity
factors (Metabolic Equivalent or MET) and reported as MET-hours per week. Chi-square
test was used to assess the proportions of different socioeconomic groups in the various
LTPA categories and Cox regression utilized to model the association between LTPA and
incidence of T2DM, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, education
level and occupation.
Results: There were significant differences in the distribution of LTPA levels across the
different socioeconomic groups. Moderate LTPA (7.5-15 MET-hours/week) was not
significantly associated with T2DM risk (HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.81-1.05), vigorous (15-25
MET-hours/week) and strenuous (25-50 MET-hours/week) levels of LTPA were
associated with reduced incidence of T2DM (HR=0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.94) and
(HR=0.81,95% CI 0.72-0.91) respectively. LTPA beyond 50 MET-hours/week had no
added benefit (HR=0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96).
Conclusion: The study demonstrated the benefits of different LTPA levels in reducing
the risk of T2DM in the MDC cohort. Moderate activity was not significantly associated
while vigorous activity and above was significantly associated with reduced risk but there
was no added benefit for LTPA beyond 50 MET-hours per week. The amount of LTPA
was significantly related to SES.},
  author       = {Mutie, Pascal},
  keyword      = {Leisure time physical activity,type 2 diabetes,prospective cohort},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE ONSET OF TYPE 2 DIABETES IN THE MALMÖ DIET AND CANCER STUDY COHORT},
  year         = {2016},
}