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Beredskapens Sverige

Satz, Ida LU (2017) HEKK02 20162
Human Ecology
Abstract
This study examines the war-time mobilization in Sweden during World War II by looking at three case studies.

The empirical part of the study focus on three specific strategies for food security lead by the Swedish authorities during the war: the transition to plant-based agriculture and consumption, use of "the forest's pantry" and cooperation between urban and rural areas. In the analysis, the study discusses how this is related to today’s climate problems and proposes that these strategies might work as a way to help us not only to prepare for the global ecological crises but also to approach the Swedish environmental “generation-goal” which partly means that the country should cut the greenhouse-gas emissions caused by Swedish... (More)
This study examines the war-time mobilization in Sweden during World War II by looking at three case studies.

The empirical part of the study focus on three specific strategies for food security lead by the Swedish authorities during the war: the transition to plant-based agriculture and consumption, use of "the forest's pantry" and cooperation between urban and rural areas. In the analysis, the study discusses how this is related to today’s climate problems and proposes that these strategies might work as a way to help us not only to prepare for the global ecological crises but also to approach the Swedish environmental “generation-goal” which partly means that the country should cut the greenhouse-gas emissions caused by Swedish consumption both in and outside the country. This means that Sweden should not export its emissions or environmental degradation to other countries.

The study uses Henk Wilke´s GEF-hypothesis which means that in a resource dilemma, where the collective good and individual wants are in conflict, peoples harvest decisions are influenced by Greed, Efficiency and Fairness. Using the GEF-hypothesis the study discusses that the case study-strategies probably would not, by themselves, solve the resource dilemma because although they might lead to a more efficient use of resources and minimize the social insecurity, they do not address the problem with greed or fair share very well. During the war this was solved by rationing, which ultimately could be a way to combat the problem with food security in the global ecological crisis. (Less)
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author
Satz, Ida LU
supervisor
organization
course
HEKK02 20162
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Resource dilemma, GEF-hypothesis, World War II, food security, transition to plant-based agriculture, use of "the forest's pantry", cooperation between urban and rural areas, global ecological crises, generation-goal.
language
Swedish
id
8899128
date added to LUP
2017-09-07 12:48:37
date last changed
2017-09-07 12:48:37
@misc{8899128,
  abstract     = {This study examines the war-time mobilization in Sweden during World War II by looking at three case studies. 

The empirical part of the study focus on three specific strategies for food security lead by the Swedish authorities during the war: the transition to plant-based agriculture and consumption, use of "the forest's pantry" and cooperation between urban and rural areas. In the analysis, the study discusses how this is related to today’s climate problems and proposes that these strategies might work as a way to help us not only to prepare for the global ecological crises but also to approach the Swedish environmental “generation-goal” which partly means that the country should cut the greenhouse-gas emissions caused by Swedish consumption both in and outside the country. This means that Sweden should not export its emissions or environmental degradation to other countries. 

The study uses Henk Wilke´s GEF-hypothesis which means that in a resource dilemma, where the collective good and individual wants are in conflict, peoples harvest decisions are influenced by Greed, Efficiency and Fairness. Using the GEF-hypothesis the study discusses that the case study-strategies probably would not, by themselves, solve the resource dilemma because although they might lead to a more efficient use of resources and minimize the social insecurity, they do not address the problem with greed or fair share very well. During the war this was solved by rationing, which ultimately could be a way to combat the problem with food security in the global ecological crisis.},
  author       = {Satz, Ida},
  keyword      = {Resource dilemma,GEF-hypothesis,World War II,food security,transition to plant-based agriculture,use of "the forest's pantry",cooperation between urban and rural areas,global ecological crises,generation-goal.},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Beredskapens Sverige},
  year         = {2017},
}