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Emotion-Related Mechanisms in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Role of Incompleteness, Harm Avoidance, and Disgust

Frostensson, Robin LU and Andersson, Frida LU (2017) PSPT02 20162
Department of Psychology
Abstract
The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between pediatric OCD and three emotion-related constructs; incompleteness, harm avoidance, and disgust sensitivity. Participants were 52 treatment seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were diagnosed with OCD or an anxiety disorder. Data was collected through self-report measures of incompleteness, harm avoidance, disgust sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. The OCD group reported significantly higher levels of incompleteness than the anxiety group, whereas no significant differences were found between the diagnostic groups for harm avoidance or disgust sensitivity. Consistent with previous research carried out on adults, significant... (More)
The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between pediatric OCD and three emotion-related constructs; incompleteness, harm avoidance, and disgust sensitivity. Participants were 52 treatment seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were diagnosed with OCD or an anxiety disorder. Data was collected through self-report measures of incompleteness, harm avoidance, disgust sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. The OCD group reported significantly higher levels of incompleteness than the anxiety group, whereas no significant differences were found between the diagnostic groups for harm avoidance or disgust sensitivity. Consistent with previous research carried out on adults, significant correlations were found between all three constructs and self-reported obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, only incompleteness made a significant contribution to the variance in obsessive-compulsive symptoms after controlling for harm avoidance and disgust sensitivity. Harm avoidance and disgust sensitivity, but not incompleteness, accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in self-reported anxiety symptoms. The current findings add to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that a sense of incompleteness may underpin certain symptoms of OCD, contributing to the overall severity of the disorder. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting incompleteness in youth with OCD may lead to improved outcomes. (Less)
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author
Frostensson, Robin LU and Andersson, Frida LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSPT02 20162
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Obsessive-compulsive disorder, OCD, incompleteness, harm avoidance, disgust sensitivity, children, adolescents
language
English
id
8899620
date added to LUP
2017-01-17 09:38:19
date last changed
2017-01-17 09:38:19
@misc{8899620,
  abstract     = {The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between pediatric OCD and three emotion-related constructs; incompleteness, harm avoidance, and disgust sensitivity. Participants were 52 treatment seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were diagnosed with OCD or an anxiety disorder. Data was collected through self-report measures of incompleteness, harm avoidance, disgust sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. The OCD group reported significantly higher levels of incompleteness than the anxiety group, whereas no significant differences were found between the diagnostic groups for harm avoidance or disgust sensitivity. Consistent with previous research carried out on adults, significant correlations were found between all three constructs and self-reported obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, only incompleteness made a significant contribution to the variance in obsessive-compulsive symptoms after controlling for harm avoidance and disgust sensitivity. Harm avoidance and disgust sensitivity, but not incompleteness, accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in self-reported anxiety symptoms. The current findings add to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that a sense of incompleteness may underpin certain symptoms of OCD, contributing to the overall severity of the disorder. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting incompleteness in youth with OCD may lead to improved outcomes.},
  author       = {Frostensson, Robin and Andersson, Frida},
  keyword      = {Obsessive-compulsive disorder,OCD,incompleteness,harm avoidance,disgust sensitivity,children,adolescents},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Emotion-Related Mechanisms in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Role of Incompleteness, Harm Avoidance, and Disgust},
  year         = {2017},
}