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A Discourse Analysis on the Swedish Non-Ratification of the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention - A Critical Postcolonial Perspective

Eng, Jonathan LU (2017) STVK02 20171
Department of Political Science
Abstract
ILO 169 – Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention - is an international treaty that deals exclusively with the rights of indigenous peoples. Sweden is a country that normally commits to human rights and international treaties. However, it is still one of the countries that has not ratified ILO 169. By conducting a critical discourse analysis with a postcolonial approach, this study problematizes and gives a new perspective to the Swedish non-ratification of ILO 169. The Swedish – Sami relationship is part of the darker chapters of the Swedish history. This study aims to understand parts of this relation from a postcolonial perspective. The postcolonial approach is built on postcolonial theories and the concept of internal colonialism. The... (More)
ILO 169 – Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention - is an international treaty that deals exclusively with the rights of indigenous peoples. Sweden is a country that normally commits to human rights and international treaties. However, it is still one of the countries that has not ratified ILO 169. By conducting a critical discourse analysis with a postcolonial approach, this study problematizes and gives a new perspective to the Swedish non-ratification of ILO 169. The Swedish – Sami relationship is part of the darker chapters of the Swedish history. This study aims to understand parts of this relation from a postcolonial perspective. The postcolonial approach is built on postcolonial theories and the concept of internal colonialism. The focus of this study is the governmental report SOU 1999:25 as well as the latest parliamentary discussion concerning a Swedish ratification of ILO 169. This study gives a new perspective of how the Swedish non-ratification is affected by the process of internal colonialism that is characterized by irresolution. The capitalist market forces and history writing as a grand narrative also seem to have an effect on the Swedish non-ratification. (Less)
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author
Eng, Jonathan LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK02 20171
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
ILO 169, Postcolonialism, Internal Colonialism, Sweden, Sami, Sápmi
language
English
id
8907701
date added to LUP
2017-07-11 15:36:27
date last changed
2017-07-11 15:36:27
@misc{8907701,
  abstract     = {ILO 169 – Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention - is an international treaty that deals exclusively with the rights of indigenous peoples. Sweden is a country that normally commits to human rights and international treaties. However, it is still one of the countries that has not ratified ILO 169. By conducting a critical discourse analysis with a postcolonial approach, this study problematizes and gives a new perspective to the Swedish non-ratification of ILO 169. The Swedish – Sami relationship is part of the darker chapters of the Swedish history. This study aims to understand parts of this relation from a postcolonial perspective. The postcolonial approach is built on postcolonial theories and the concept of internal colonialism. The focus of this study is the governmental report SOU 1999:25 as well as the latest parliamentary discussion concerning a Swedish ratification of ILO 169. This study gives a new perspective of how the Swedish non-ratification is affected by the process of internal colonialism that is characterized by irresolution. The capitalist market forces and history writing as a grand narrative also seem to have an effect on the Swedish non-ratification.},
  author       = {Eng, Jonathan},
  keyword      = {ILO 169,Postcolonialism,Internal Colonialism,Sweden,Sami,Sápmi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A Discourse Analysis on the Swedish Non-Ratification of the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention - A Critical Postcolonial Perspective},
  year         = {2017},
}