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Living On The Edge - Reinventing the amphibiotic habitat of the Mesopotamian Marshlands

Lundberg, Sebastian LU (2017) AAHM01 20171
Department of Architecture and the Built Environment
Abstract
The Mesopotamian Marshlands form one of the first landscapes where people started to transform and manipulate the natural environment in order to sustain human habitation. For thousands of years people transformed natural ecosystems into agricultural fields, residential clusters and other agglomerated environments to sustain long term settlement. Moreover, the Mesopotamian Marshlands, located in one of the hottest and most arid areas on the planet, formed a unique wetlands ecosystem, which apart from millions of people, sustained a very high number of wildlife and endemic species. Several historical, political, social and climatic changes, which densely occurred during the past century, completely destroyed the unique civilisation of the... (More)
The Mesopotamian Marshlands form one of the first landscapes where people started to transform and manipulate the natural environment in order to sustain human habitation. For thousands of years people transformed natural ecosystems into agricultural fields, residential clusters and other agglomerated environments to sustain long term settlement. Moreover, the Mesopotamian Marshlands, located in one of the hottest and most arid areas on the planet, formed a unique wetlands ecosystem, which apart from millions of people, sustained a very high number of wildlife and endemic species. Several historical, political, social and climatic changes, which densely occurred during the past century, completely destroyed the unique civilisation of the area, made all the wild flora and fauna disappear and forced hundreds of thousands people to migrate. During the last decade, many efforts have been made to restore the marshlands. However, these efforts are lacking central planing, coherent goals and deep understanding of the complex current geopolitical situation, making the restoration process an extremely difficult task. This dissertation project aims at providing strategies for recovering the Mesopotamian Marshlands, organising productive functions in order to sustain the local population and design a new inhabitation model, using advanced computational tools while taking into account the extreme climatic conditions and several unique cultural aspects. (Less)
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author
Lundberg, Sebastian LU
supervisor
organization
course
AAHM01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8908084
date added to LUP
2017-12-11 14:14:35
date last changed
2017-12-11 14:14:35
@misc{8908084,
  abstract     = {The Mesopotamian Marshlands form one of the first landscapes where people started to transform and manipulate the natural environment in order to sustain human habitation. For thousands of years people transformed natural ecosystems into agricultural fields, residential clusters and other agglomerated environments to sustain long term settlement. Moreover, the Mesopotamian Marshlands, located in one of the hottest and most arid areas on the planet, formed a unique wetlands ecosystem, which apart from millions of people, sustained a very high number of wildlife and endemic species. Several historical, political, social and climatic changes, which densely occurred during the past century, completely destroyed the unique civilisation of the area, made all the wild flora and fauna disappear and forced hundreds of thousands people to migrate. During the last decade, many efforts have been made to restore the marshlands. However, these efforts are lacking central planing, coherent goals and deep understanding of the complex current geopolitical situation, making the restoration process an extremely difficult task. This dissertation project aims at providing strategies for recovering the Mesopotamian Marshlands, organising productive functions in order to sustain the local population and design a new inhabitation model, using advanced computational tools while taking into account the extreme climatic conditions and several unique cultural aspects.},
  author       = {Lundberg, Sebastian},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Living On The Edge - Reinventing the amphibiotic habitat of the Mesopotamian Marshlands},
  year         = {2017},
}