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Clean Clothes or Tainted Origins? - Human Rights Due Diligence in the Garment Supply Chain

Marthinussen, Linn LU (2017) LAGM01 20171
Department of Law
Abstract
In today’s global economy it is common that multinational clothing brands are organizing their production through complex global supply chains. The downside is that severe human rights violations take place throughout the supply chain. Considering this problematic, this thesis examines the concept of human rights due diligence (HRDD) in the context of global supply chains with specific attention to the garment sector and multinational brands’ responsibility. The focus of the thesis is on how far in the supply chain the corporations should go when they are conducting HRDD and which methods that can be used for implementation.

To fulfill the purpose of the thesis to identify the content of HRDD in relation to the global garment supply... (More)
In today’s global economy it is common that multinational clothing brands are organizing their production through complex global supply chains. The downside is that severe human rights violations take place throughout the supply chain. Considering this problematic, this thesis examines the concept of human rights due diligence (HRDD) in the context of global supply chains with specific attention to the garment sector and multinational brands’ responsibility. The focus of the thesis is on how far in the supply chain the corporations should go when they are conducting HRDD and which methods that can be used for implementation.

To fulfill the purpose of the thesis to identify the content of HRDD in relation to the global garment supply chain, the structure of the garment supply is examined as well as international soft law frameworks, multistakeholder-initiatives and domestic supply chain regulations. Moreover, a case study of five large clothing companies is presented to illustrate the implementation in practice.

The result of the examined soft law frameworks present a coherent view on the scope of HRDD and demand the corporations to go beyond the first tier of suppliers when assessing risks. On the other hand, the domestic transparency laws imposing brands to disclose information about their HRDD processes, are more careful in obligating corporations to report on risks throughout the supply chain. The case study further shows that the brands are committed to assess risks beyond the first tier and do so to some extent.

Regarding the methods for practical implementation of HRDD, various methods are identified and examined. The main methods include social audits, delegating and sharing responsibility with suppliers and certifications.
Despite that the methods to some extent can be used to implement HRDD they encounter obstacles for an effective implementation in the global supply chain. Some of the main obstacles presented include lack of exchange of information throughout the supply chain and focus on the upper tiers. A key to enhance HRDD in the global garment supply chain is collaboration with suppliers and visibility throughout the chain. (Less)
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author
Marthinussen, Linn LU
supervisor
organization
course
LAGM01 20171
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Labour law, global supply chains, corporate social responsibility, human right due diligence, garment industry
language
English
id
8908767
date added to LUP
2017-06-19 17:43:56
date last changed
2017-06-19 17:43:56
@misc{8908767,
  abstract     = {In today’s global economy it is common that multinational clothing brands are organizing their production through complex global supply chains. The downside is that severe human rights violations take place throughout the supply chain. Considering this problematic, this thesis examines the concept of human rights due diligence (HRDD) in the context of global supply chains with specific attention to the garment sector and multinational brands’ responsibility. The focus of the thesis is on how far in the supply chain the corporations should go when they are conducting HRDD and which methods that can be used for implementation.

To fulfill the purpose of the thesis to identify the content of HRDD in relation to the global garment supply chain, the structure of the garment supply is examined as well as international soft law frameworks, multistakeholder-initiatives and domestic supply chain regulations. Moreover, a case study of five large clothing companies is presented to illustrate the implementation in practice.

The result of the examined soft law frameworks present a coherent view on the scope of HRDD and demand the corporations to go beyond the first tier of suppliers when assessing risks. On the other hand, the domestic transparency laws imposing brands to disclose information about their HRDD processes, are more careful in obligating corporations to report on risks throughout the supply chain. The case study further shows that the brands are committed to assess risks beyond the first tier and do so to some extent.

Regarding the methods for practical implementation of HRDD, various methods are identified and examined. The main methods include social audits, delegating and sharing responsibility with suppliers and certifications. 
Despite that the methods to some extent can be used to implement HRDD they encounter obstacles for an effective implementation in the global supply chain. Some of the main obstacles presented include lack of exchange of information throughout the supply chain and focus on the upper tiers. A key to enhance HRDD in the global garment supply chain is collaboration with suppliers and visibility throughout the chain.},
  author       = {Marthinussen, Linn},
  keyword      = {Labour law,global supply chains,corporate social responsibility,human right due diligence,garment industry},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Clean Clothes or Tainted Origins? - Human Rights Due Diligence in the Garment Supply Chain},
  year         = {2017},
}