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Realpolitik och moralpolitik under prostitutionsreformen i Nya Zealand

Koivurinta, Sandra LU (2017) SOPA63 20171
School of Social Work
Abstract
The purpose of this bachelor’s thesis was to examine potential moral politics and real politics in the process of prostitution reform, relating to regulation of the sex industry in New Zealand. The last draft of the prostitution reform bill, the latest updated Prostitution Reform Act 2003 and the bill’s parliamentary readings were analysed through document analysis, inspired by perspective analysis. The main result of this research was that the Prostitution Reform Act 2003 seemed to be influenced by a blend of moral politics and real politics depending on feminist ideologies, and with the application of laws such as Immigration Act 2009 (clause 19), Social Security Act 1964 (clause 18) or the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (clause 10).... (More)
The purpose of this bachelor’s thesis was to examine potential moral politics and real politics in the process of prostitution reform, relating to regulation of the sex industry in New Zealand. The last draft of the prostitution reform bill, the latest updated Prostitution Reform Act 2003 and the bill’s parliamentary readings were analysed through document analysis, inspired by perspective analysis. The main result of this research was that the Prostitution Reform Act 2003 seemed to be influenced by a blend of moral politics and real politics depending on feminist ideologies, and with the application of laws such as Immigration Act 2009 (clause 19), Social Security Act 1964 (clause 18) or the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (clause 10). Moral politics was most visible through ideological considerations and apprehensions regarding prostitution reform, as well as through clauses concerning additional rights and restrictions in the Prostitution Reform Act 2003, while real politics was based on aspects of the statement of purpose; to safeguard human rights of sex workers, protect sex workers from exploitation, promote the health and safety of sex workers, and to prohibit the use of persons under 18 years of age. Therefore, implying that the arguments and warrant for decriminalisation of the sex industry in New Zealand did not entail higher acceptance levels of the existence of sex work or sex work as labour work, but rather use of liberal governmentality as an attempt to improve the health and safety of existent sex workers. Furthermore, signifying that the legal approach was favoured as a political resolution based on harm reduction and an aim to support the health and safety of domestic, adult sex workers, rather than a moral acceptance or condemnation of the social phenomenon itself. (Less)
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author
Koivurinta, Sandra LU
supervisor
organization
course
SOPA63 20171
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
avkriminalisering, feminism, governmentality, New Zealand, moral politics, real politics, prostitution reform, Decriminalisation, prostitutionsreform, realpolitik, moralpolitik
language
Swedish
id
8913729
date added to LUP
2017-09-07 13:37:23
date last changed
2017-09-25 15:36:18
@misc{8913729,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this bachelor’s thesis was to examine potential moral politics and real politics in the process of prostitution reform, relating to regulation of the sex industry in New Zealand. The last draft of the prostitution reform bill, the latest updated Prostitution Reform Act 2003 and the bill’s parliamentary readings were analysed through document analysis, inspired by perspective analysis. The main result of this research was that the Prostitution Reform Act 2003 seemed to be influenced by a blend of moral politics and real politics depending on feminist ideologies, and with the application of laws such as Immigration Act 2009 (clause 19), Social Security Act 1964 (clause 18) or the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (clause 10). Moral politics was most visible through ideological considerations and apprehensions regarding prostitution reform, as well as through clauses concerning additional rights and restrictions in the Prostitution Reform Act 2003, while real politics was based on aspects of the statement of purpose; to safeguard human rights of sex workers, protect sex workers from exploitation, promote the health and safety of sex workers, and to prohibit the use of persons under 18 years of age. Therefore, implying that the arguments and warrant for decriminalisation of the sex industry in New Zealand did not entail higher acceptance levels of the existence of sex work or sex work as labour work, but rather use of liberal governmentality as an attempt to improve the health and safety of existent sex workers. Furthermore, signifying that the legal approach was favoured as a political resolution based on harm reduction and an aim to support the health and safety of domestic, adult sex workers, rather than a moral acceptance or condemnation of the social phenomenon itself.},
  author       = {Koivurinta, Sandra},
  keyword      = {avkriminalisering,feminism,governmentality,New Zealand,moral politics,real politics,prostitution reform,Decriminalisation,prostitutionsreform,realpolitik,moralpolitik},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Realpolitik och moralpolitik under prostitutionsreformen i Nya Zealand},
  year         = {2017},
}