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The relationship between sensory processing and the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in treatment-seeking youth

Kulin, Eva LU and Myhr, Andrea LU (2017) PSPR14 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
The primary aim of the study was to investigate the applicability of Dunn’s sensory processing model (1997) to youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The model describes four patterns of sensory processing: sensory sensitivity, sensation avoiding, low registration and sensation seeking. The current study test whether these four processes are related to, and differentiate, OCD from anxiety. As a secondary aim, the relationship between sensory processing and three emotion-related constructs (sensitivity to disgust, incompleteness and harm avoidance) that were previously found to explain variance in OCD in the present sample is evaluated. Participants were 66 treatment-seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were... (More)
The primary aim of the study was to investigate the applicability of Dunn’s sensory processing model (1997) to youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The model describes four patterns of sensory processing: sensory sensitivity, sensation avoiding, low registration and sensation seeking. The current study test whether these four processes are related to, and differentiate, OCD from anxiety. As a secondary aim, the relationship between sensory processing and three emotion-related constructs (sensitivity to disgust, incompleteness and harm avoidance) that were previously found to explain variance in OCD in the present sample is evaluated. Participants were 66 treatment-seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were diagnosed with OCD or an anxiety disorder. The anxiety group was used as a control group. Participants completed self-report measures designed to assess OCD, anxiety, sensory processing, and the three emotion related constructs. In partial support of the applicability of Dunn’s model (1997) to youth, significant correlations were observed between three of the four sensory processes and the severity of OCD and anxiety. However, youth with primary OCD did not differ from those with primary anxiety on the sensory processing variables. Finally, the sensory processing variables did not contribute significantly to the severity of OCD after controlling for the three emotion-related constructs, but did for the severity of anxiety. Further research is needed to evaluate if this is an area to be targeted in OCD-treatment, or if it is more related to anxiety. (Less)
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author
Kulin, Eva LU and Myhr, Andrea LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSPR14 20171
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, OCD, anxiety, sensory processing, sensory hypersensitivity, sensory hyposensitivity, the Sensory Profile, children, adolescents
language
English
id
8914727
date added to LUP
2017-06-13 22:03:12
date last changed
2017-06-13 22:03:12
@misc{8914727,
  abstract     = {The primary aim of the study was to investigate the applicability of Dunn’s sensory processing model (1997) to youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The model describes four patterns of sensory processing: sensory sensitivity, sensation avoiding, low registration and sensation seeking. The current study test whether these four processes are related to, and differentiate, OCD from anxiety. As a secondary aim, the relationship between sensory processing and three emotion-related constructs (sensitivity to disgust, incompleteness and harm avoidance) that were previously found to explain variance in OCD in the present sample is evaluated. Participants were 66 treatment-seeking children and adolescents (aged 8-17 years) who were diagnosed with OCD or an anxiety disorder. The anxiety group was used as a control group. Participants completed self-report measures designed to assess OCD, anxiety, sensory processing, and the three emotion related constructs. In partial support of the applicability of Dunn’s model (1997) to youth, significant correlations were observed between three of the four sensory processes and the severity of OCD and anxiety. However, youth with primary OCD did not differ from those with primary anxiety on the sensory processing variables. Finally, the sensory processing variables did not contribute significantly to the severity of OCD after controlling for the three emotion-related constructs, but did for the severity of anxiety. Further research is needed to evaluate if this is an area to be targeted in OCD-treatment, or if it is more related to anxiety.},
  author       = {Kulin, Eva and Myhr, Andrea},
  keyword      = {Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder,OCD,anxiety,sensory processing,sensory hypersensitivity,sensory hyposensitivity,the Sensory Profile,children,adolescents},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The relationship between sensory processing and the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in treatment-seeking youth},
  year         = {2017},
}