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Development and simulation of an active target detector with GEM foil readout

Rickert, Elisabeth LU (2017) FYSM60 20171
Department of Physics
Nuclear physics
Abstract
At CERN, radioactive ion beams with energies of up to 10 MeV/u can be pro-
duced by a newly commissioned post-accelerator, HIE-ISOLDE, which expands
the possibilities for nuclear reaction studies. To investigate the collision properties
of the ion beam with a target, an active gas–target detector is under development
by the Reactions Group at the Nuclear Physics Division in Lund. The existing
detector setup was further investigated in this thesis. Experimental tests of the
gain and stability of the detector were performed with the simulation package
Garfield++ for a 82/18 Ar/CO 2 gas mixture and a 55 Fe source. The results were
compared to results obtained from an earlier project. Simulations of electron
drift were performed for... (More)
At CERN, radioactive ion beams with energies of up to 10 MeV/u can be pro-
duced by a newly commissioned post-accelerator, HIE-ISOLDE, which expands
the possibilities for nuclear reaction studies. To investigate the collision properties
of the ion beam with a target, an active gas–target detector is under development
by the Reactions Group at the Nuclear Physics Division in Lund. The existing
detector setup was further investigated in this thesis. Experimental tests of the
gain and stability of the detector were performed with the simulation package
Garfield++ for a 82/18 Ar/CO 2 gas mixture and a 55 Fe source. The results were
compared to results obtained from an earlier project. Simulations of electron
drift were performed for different drift distances to characterize the spread of an
electron cloud to design a new backgammon shaped readout plane to investigate
the electron diffusion. First tests of new readout electronics have been performed
and a C++ file has been written to investigate cross talk of the used Kapton
cables. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Simulations of heavy element synthesis
How to improve on the knowledge of heavy element production using a gas
box

The creation of elements, the basis for life on earth, is a topic of long standing interest and it is particularly interesting for the production of heavy elements above iron.
Stars that gain energy by fusion reactions can produce elements up to iron. Heavier
stable and radioactive nuclei are supposed to be created in star explosions. To simulate
the reactions that occur in such environments, collisions between a gas and radioactive
atomic nuclei can be used. For this purpose, radioactive particles can be shot into a gas
that acts as target and detector at the same time. The reaction products reveal proper-
ties of... (More)
Simulations of heavy element synthesis
How to improve on the knowledge of heavy element production using a gas
box

The creation of elements, the basis for life on earth, is a topic of long standing interest and it is particularly interesting for the production of heavy elements above iron.
Stars that gain energy by fusion reactions can produce elements up to iron. Heavier
stable and radioactive nuclei are supposed to be created in star explosions. To simulate
the reactions that occur in such environments, collisions between a gas and radioactive
atomic nuclei can be used. For this purpose, radioactive particles can be shot into a gas
that acts as target and detector at the same time. The reaction products reveal proper-
ties of the interaction, which then helps to improve the understanding of heavy element
synthesis. At the ISOLDE facility at CERN, such experiments take place. The active
gas-target detector developed in this thesis is planned to be used in these experiments.
In this thesis tests have been performed with a specific type of detector, based on
Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils for this purpose. The detector contains a gas filled
volume, to which a drift potential is applied via a drift cathode. When a charged particle
enters the gas, it will kick out electrons from the gas atom shell. This ionization process
is used to track the particles path and recreate the reaction. Due to the electric field,
the electrons produce will drift towards the anode readout plane and ionize further gas
atoms in collisions. To see the signal, the electrons are multiplied by the GEM foils.
These foils are thin polymer foils coated with copper and perforated with small holes.
Depending on where a radioactive particle moves through the gas, a trace of electrons is
created and the particle can be tracked. From the length of the track and the amplitude
of the produced signals, the energy of the reaction products can be determined. More-
over, the detected particles can be identified by their specific energy loss in the gas.With
the help of a gas filled GEM detector box, one can therefore investigate super element
synthesis and uncover the secrets of stars interior. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Rickert, Elisabeth LU
supervisor
organization
course
FYSM60 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8914868
date added to LUP
2017-06-14 17:06:18
date last changed
2017-06-14 17:06:18
@misc{8914868,
  abstract     = {At CERN, radioactive ion beams with energies of up to 10 MeV/u can be pro-
duced by a newly commissioned post-accelerator, HIE-ISOLDE, which expands
the possibilities for nuclear reaction studies. To investigate the collision properties
of the ion beam with a target, an active gas–target detector is under development
by the Reactions Group at the Nuclear Physics Division in Lund. The existing
detector setup was further investigated in this thesis. Experimental tests of the
gain and stability of the detector were performed with the simulation package
Garfield++ for a 82/18 Ar/CO 2 gas mixture and a 55 Fe source. The results were
compared to results obtained from an earlier project. Simulations of electron
drift were performed for different drift distances to characterize the spread of an
electron cloud to design a new backgammon shaped readout plane to investigate
the electron diffusion. First tests of new readout electronics have been performed
and a C++ file has been written to investigate cross talk of the used Kapton
cables.},
  author       = {Rickert, Elisabeth},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Development and simulation of an active target detector with GEM foil readout},
  year         = {2017},
}