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Reclaim the Streets

Devery, Peter LU (2017) AAHM01 20171
Department of Architecture and the Built Environment
Abstract
Reclaim the Streets is a study of exploitation and parametrically driven urban planning. The land I propose to be exploited are the buffer zones that since the 1950s started being reserved along major roads, and since mostly have been left untouched. The wide passages have created barriers in the city that affect pedestrians by increasing travel times and creating unsafe places. My intention is to combat this by using parametric design tools and Space Syntax to analyse the city fabric and allocate new crossings and development in an attempt to tie the city together.
The parametric way of working is suitable for working with flows and path-finding, which I see as an important factor to take into consideration when planning new development.... (More)
Reclaim the Streets is a study of exploitation and parametrically driven urban planning. The land I propose to be exploited are the buffer zones that since the 1950s started being reserved along major roads, and since mostly have been left untouched. The wide passages have created barriers in the city that affect pedestrians by increasing travel times and creating unsafe places. My intention is to combat this by using parametric design tools and Space Syntax to analyse the city fabric and allocate new crossings and development in an attempt to tie the city together.
The parametric way of working is suitable for working with flows and path-finding, which I see as an important factor to take into consideration when planning new development. It is also a new and relatively unexplored way of thinking which opens up the possibility to discover new strategies. A parametric way of working also motivates the design decisions, as long as the choice of parameters is relevant. Lastly, and maybe the biggest advantage of parametric design, there is the advantage of flexibility. By inserting new information you can automatically update the final result without having to start from the beginning. This makes it possible to try out a larger number of strategies, leading to a higher degree of analysis and a greater understanding.
The initial study of this work highlights the problems with these buffer zones as well as the current directions of planning involving them. After looking at solutions for these problems, as well as the physical restrictions when building close to a road, an overall strategy is developed. This strategy builds upon the before-mentioned idea of path-finding as the main influence. This is implemented into the planning process by creating a script in the parametric plug-in program Grasshopper for Rhinoceros 3D. Except for path-finding capabilities, the script (or planning tool) also includes a capability for dispersal of lots, as well as importing different kinds of data that can be automatically applied on said lots. This data is used to define different requirements that the developers have to
take into consideration when planning the individual developments. To give an idea of how this tool works in planning it is tested by being applied to an area along a stretch of road west of Stockholm. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Devery, Peter LU
supervisor
organization
course
AAHM01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
arkitektur, parametrisk design, stadsplanering
language
Swedish
id
8916659
date added to LUP
2017-12-11 15:00:16
date last changed
2017-12-11 15:00:16
@misc{8916659,
  abstract     = {Reclaim the Streets is a study of exploitation and parametrically driven urban planning. The land I propose to be exploited are the buffer zones that since the 1950s started being reserved along major roads, and since mostly have been left untouched. The wide passages have created barriers in the city that affect pedestrians by increasing travel times and creating unsafe places. My intention is to combat this by using parametric design tools and Space Syntax to analyse the city fabric and allocate new crossings and development in an attempt to tie the city together.
The parametric way of working is suitable for working with flows and path-finding, which I see as an important factor to take into consideration when planning new development. It is also a new and relatively unexplored way of thinking which opens up the possibility to discover new strategies. A parametric way of working also motivates the design decisions, as long as the choice of parameters is relevant. Lastly, and maybe the biggest advantage of parametric design, there is the advantage of flexibility. By inserting new information you can automatically update the final result without having to start from the beginning. This makes it possible to try out a larger number of strategies, leading to a higher degree of analysis and a greater understanding.
The initial study of this work highlights the problems with these buffer zones as well as the current directions of planning involving them. After looking at solutions for these problems, as well as the physical restrictions when building close to a road, an overall strategy is developed. This strategy builds upon the before-mentioned idea of path-finding as the main influence. This is implemented into the planning process by creating a script in the parametric plug-in program Grasshopper for Rhinoceros 3D. Except for path-finding capabilities, the script (or planning tool) also includes a capability for dispersal of lots, as well as importing different kinds of data that can be automatically applied on said lots. This data is used to define different requirements that the developers have to
take into consideration when planning the individual developments. To give an idea of how this tool works in planning it is tested by being applied to an area along a stretch of road west of Stockholm.},
  author       = {Devery, Peter},
  keyword      = {arkitektur,parametrisk design,stadsplanering},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Reclaim the Streets},
  year         = {2017},
}