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Study of glazed spaces as a renovation strategy for two typical residential multi-apartment buildings from the Swedish Million Programme

Persson, André LU and Bajars, Kaspars LU (2017) AEBM01 20171
Energy and Building Design
Abstract
There were around one million apartments built in Sweden during 1965 to 1974 as part of the so called Swedish Million Programme, almost half of them concentrated in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmoe. These building are now considered unattractive. The need of renovation is urgent in many aspects -ventilation, windows, balconies, facades and sanitary pipe replacement. The total investment cost for the Million Programme has been estimated from 300 billion SEK to 500 billion SEKand is now one of the most discussed socio-economical and housing policy topics in Sweden. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy saving and thermal comfort potential of adding glazed spaces to existing building façades and determine if and to what extent... (More)
There were around one million apartments built in Sweden during 1965 to 1974 as part of the so called Swedish Million Programme, almost half of them concentrated in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmoe. These building are now considered unattractive. The need of renovation is urgent in many aspects -ventilation, windows, balconies, facades and sanitary pipe replacement. The total investment cost for the Million Programme has been estimated from 300 billion SEK to 500 billion SEKand is now one of the most discussed socio-economical and housing policy topics in Sweden. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy saving and thermal comfort potential of adding glazed spaces to existing building façades and determine if and to what extent the glazed alternatives could compete with a fully opaque solution that used traditional insulation instead. Two different glazed alternatives were proposed and their impact on annual energy demand and thermal comfort in living spaces was tested on one low and one high-rise lamella building in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmoe. A sensitivity analysis on energy and thermal comfort was performed for both glazed alternatives. Note that the balcony doors were always closed in all the studied cases. Each solution’s life cycle profit was analysed through various future scenarios where the price growth rate for energy and maintenance varied and was accounted with a real yield of 4%. IDA-ICE was the only simulation tool used in this work. It was found that by implementing glazing elements together with solely opaque elements can reduce the specific energy demand to the same extent as when using only opaque insulation elements. The specific energy use was reduced from 127 kWh/(m²·y)to 52kWh/(m²·y)on the low-rise lamella building and from 118 kWh/(m²·y)to 56 kWh/(m²·y)on the high-rise lamella building, meaning that both buildings could achieve the limits of the Swedish building code. The glazed alternatives showed to contribute more to a better indoor thermal climate as the overheating hours could be decreased by up to 68% compared to the opaque solution when implemented on the low-rise building, meaning that the FEBY 12 standards for thermal comfort could be met. However, when implementing the glazed solutions on the high-rise building, the FEBY 12 requirements could not be met even though the overheating was reduced compared to the opaque solution. The g-value of the glazing showed to have the highest impact on both the heating demand and the thermal comfort. The two glazed alternatives showed to not have the same profitability potential as the opaque renovation solution but it could however be solved in some cases by increasingthe rent. The high-rise building was generally more prone for profitable investments.It is suggested that housing companies would chose a fully opaque solution in order to expect a profit on the investment. However, it is also suggested that implementing glazed balconies together with opaque elements could be an option if the building is situated in communities with stronger household economies since the investment is in likely need of a rent increase to become profitable. Additional storage space, improved building appearance, weather resilience and balcony lifespan among many others were also considered as possible co-benefits that were introduced when implementing glazed spaces. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Glazing balconies and adding a glazed skin to the existing building façade can under the right circumstances achieve the same energy savings as when using opaque insulation. It will also reduce apartment overheating caused by very well insulated building envelope. Moreover, they add other values like improved building appearance, increased estate property value, allows rent increase, reduces outside noise and improves safety among many other.
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author
Persson, André LU and Bajars, Kaspars LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Theoretical analysis of two reference buildings
course
AEBM01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Energy renovation, Swedish Million Programme, glazed spaces, glazed balconies, double skin facade, energy efficient buildings, thermal comfort, economic feasibility, life cycle profit.
language
English
id
8918616
date added to LUP
2017-06-26 10:33:13
date last changed
2017-06-26 10:33:13
@misc{8918616,
  abstract     = {There were around one million apartments built in Sweden during 1965 to 1974 as part of the so called Swedish Million Programme, almost half of them concentrated in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmoe. These building are now considered unattractive. The need of renovation is urgent in many aspects -ventilation, windows, balconies, facades and sanitary pipe replacement. The total investment cost for the Million Programme has been estimated from 300 billion SEK to 500 billion SEKand is now one of the most discussed socio-economical and housing policy topics in Sweden. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy saving and thermal comfort potential of adding glazed spaces to existing building façades and determine if and to what extent the glazed alternatives could compete with a fully opaque solution that used traditional insulation instead. Two different glazed alternatives were proposed and their impact on annual energy demand and thermal comfort in living spaces was tested on one low and one high-rise lamella building in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmoe. A sensitivity analysis on energy and thermal comfort was performed for both glazed alternatives. Note that the balcony doors were always closed in all the studied cases. Each solution’s life cycle profit was analysed through various future scenarios where the price growth rate for energy and maintenance varied and was accounted with a real yield of 4%. IDA-ICE was the only simulation tool used in this work. It was found that by implementing glazing elements together with solely opaque elements can reduce the specific energy demand to the same extent as when using only opaque insulation elements. The specific energy use was reduced from 127 kWh/(m²·y)to 52kWh/(m²·y)on the low-rise lamella building and from 118 kWh/(m²·y)to 56 kWh/(m²·y)on the high-rise lamella building, meaning that both buildings could achieve the limits of the Swedish building code. The glazed alternatives showed to contribute more to a better indoor thermal climate as the overheating hours could be decreased by up to 68% compared to the opaque solution when implemented on the low-rise building, meaning that the FEBY 12 standards for thermal comfort could be met. However, when implementing the glazed solutions on the high-rise building, the FEBY 12 requirements could not be met even though the overheating was reduced compared to the opaque solution. The g-value of the glazing showed to have the highest impact on both the heating demand and the thermal comfort. The two glazed alternatives showed to not have the same profitability potential as the opaque renovation solution but it could however be solved in some cases by increasingthe rent. The high-rise building was generally more prone for profitable investments.It is suggested that housing companies would chose a fully opaque solution in order to expect a profit on the investment. However, it is also suggested that implementing glazed balconies together with opaque elements could be an option if the building is situated in communities with stronger household economies since the investment is in likely need of a rent increase to become profitable. Additional storage space, improved building appearance, weather resilience and balcony lifespan among many others were also considered as possible co-benefits that were introduced when implementing glazed spaces.},
  author       = {Persson, André and Bajars, Kaspars},
  keyword      = {Energy renovation,Swedish Million Programme,glazed spaces,glazed balconies,double skin facade,energy efficient buildings,thermal comfort,economic feasibility,life cycle profit.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Study of glazed spaces as a renovation strategy for two typical residential multi-apartment buildings from the Swedish Million Programme},
  year         = {2017},
}