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Knowledge and Its Impact on Identities of Ukrainian Trans*(gender/sexual) People

Romaniuk, Olena LU (2017) SIMV21 20171
Graduate School
Master of Science in Social Studies of Gender
Sociology
Abstract
Trans*(sex/gender) is an increasingly common phenomenon of the contemporary world. Psychology, Feminist, Queer and Transgender studies have suggested various interpretations of trans* experiences. Departing from certain assumptions that notions of sex and gender are either authentic or performative, these disciplines have established worldwide the tenet that trans* is medically pathological or socially transgressive phenomenon. However, these perspectives have tended to overlook the ways in which the knowledge discourses that they have developed influence on lives of trans* individuals. Postmodernists and critical sociologists propose to research knowledge as a power system. This thesis presents the results of an explorative study that... (More)
Trans*(sex/gender) is an increasingly common phenomenon of the contemporary world. Psychology, Feminist, Queer and Transgender studies have suggested various interpretations of trans* experiences. Departing from certain assumptions that notions of sex and gender are either authentic or performative, these disciplines have established worldwide the tenet that trans* is medically pathological or socially transgressive phenomenon. However, these perspectives have tended to overlook the ways in which the knowledge discourses that they have developed influence on lives of trans* individuals. Postmodernists and critical sociologists propose to research knowledge as a power system. This thesis presents the results of an explorative study that uncovers the impact knowledge has on identities of trans* individuals. Firstly, it details the ways in which social discourse that transmits the knowledge about gender binary and trans* phenomena influence on the formation of trans* identity. Secondly, the research is focused on Ukraine and illustrates ‘globalization’ of Anglophone trans* discourses beyond the US and Western European borders and its modification in accordance with the local context. Finally, it demonstrates how the theoretical narratives about trans* phenomena construct the manner trans* individuals understand their experiences. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Trans*(sex/gender) is an increasingly common phenomenon of the contemporary world. Psychology, Feminist, Queer and Transgender studies have suggested various interpretations of trans* experiences. Departing from certain assumptions that notions of sex and gender are either authentic or performative, these disciplines have established worldwide the tenet that trans* is medically pathological or socially transgressive phenomenon. However, these perspectives have tended to overlook the ways in which the knowledge discourses that they have developed influence on lives of trans* individuals. Postmodernists and critical sociologists propose to research knowledge as a power system. This thesis presents the results of an explorative study that... (More)
Trans*(sex/gender) is an increasingly common phenomenon of the contemporary world. Psychology, Feminist, Queer and Transgender studies have suggested various interpretations of trans* experiences. Departing from certain assumptions that notions of sex and gender are either authentic or performative, these disciplines have established worldwide the tenet that trans* is medically pathological or socially transgressive phenomenon. However, these perspectives have tended to overlook the ways in which the knowledge discourses that they have developed influence on lives of trans* individuals. Postmodernists and critical sociologists propose to research knowledge as a power system. This thesis presents the results of an explorative study that uncovers the impact knowledge has on identities of trans* individuals. Firstly, it details the ways in which social discourse that transmits the knowledge about gender binary and trans* phenomena influence on the formation of trans* identity. Secondly, the research is focused on Ukraine and illustrates ‘globalization’ of Anglophone trans* discourses beyond the US and Western European borders and its modification in accordance with the local context. Finally, it demonstrates how the theoretical narratives about trans* phenomena construct the manner trans* individuals understand their experiences. (Less)
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author
Romaniuk, Olena LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Knowledge and Its Impact on Identities of Ukrainian Trans*(gender/sexual) People
course
SIMV21 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Transgender, Transsexual, Identity, Knowledge, Social Discourse, Ukraine
language
English
additional info
I want to express my deepest gratitude to my supervisor Rebecca Selberg for her understanding, support and constructive comments of my work throughout the whole process of writing this thesis.
Also, I owe great thanks to the Swedish Institute for providing me with the funding to study at Lund University.
Many thanks to the NGO “Insight” for giving me the opportunity to conduct my fieldwork, as well as to all my research participants for sharing with me their very personal experiences.
I am grateful to my parents, who were always there for me in the most difficult moments.
Last but not least, my love and appreciation to my life-partner Rafael Quintero for his continuous help, without which it had not been possible for me to finish my master studies.
id
8920440
date added to LUP
2017-07-03 13:02:01
date last changed
2017-07-03 13:02:01
@misc{8920440,
  abstract     = {Trans*(sex/gender) is an increasingly common phenomenon of the contemporary world. Psychology, Feminist, Queer and Transgender studies have suggested various interpretations of trans* experiences. Departing from certain assumptions that notions of sex and gender are either authentic or performative, these disciplines have established worldwide the tenet that trans* is medically pathological or socially transgressive phenomenon. However, these perspectives have tended to overlook the ways in which the knowledge discourses that they have developed influence on lives of trans* individuals. Postmodernists and critical sociologists propose to research knowledge as a power system. This thesis presents the results of an explorative study that uncovers the impact knowledge has on identities of trans* individuals. Firstly, it details the ways in which social discourse that transmits the knowledge about gender binary and trans* phenomena influence on the formation of trans* identity. Secondly, the research is focused on Ukraine and illustrates ‘globalization’ of Anglophone trans* discourses beyond the US and Western European borders and its modification in accordance with the local context. Finally, it demonstrates how the theoretical narratives about trans* phenomena construct the manner trans* individuals understand their experiences.},
  author       = {Romaniuk, Olena},
  keyword      = {Transgender,Transsexual,Identity,Knowledge,Social Discourse,Ukraine},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Knowledge and Its Impact on Identities of Ukrainian Trans*(gender/sexual) People},
  year         = {2017},
}