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Exploring Scientists' Communication Behaviour - A Theory of Planned Behaviour Approach

Kramer, Katharina LU (2017) SKPM08 20171
Department of Strategic Communication
Abstract
In this globalised world, the interest of the general public in scientific knowledge is ever increasing. Research institutions and especially the scientists are more and more in demand to communicate their research findings and inform the general public. Surveys, however, suggest that the scientists’ engagement is lacking, as only a small amount of is actually engaging. This study explores key factors that lead scientists to engage in science communication activities. Built on the theory of planned behaviour by Fishbein and Ajzen (1975, 1991), attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control as well as intentions were examined regarding their predictive effects towards engagement. A cross-sectional self-administered online survey was... (More)
In this globalised world, the interest of the general public in scientific knowledge is ever increasing. Research institutions and especially the scientists are more and more in demand to communicate their research findings and inform the general public. Surveys, however, suggest that the scientists’ engagement is lacking, as only a small amount of is actually engaging. This study explores key factors that lead scientists to engage in science communication activities. Built on the theory of planned behaviour by Fishbein and Ajzen (1975, 1991), attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control as well as intentions were examined regarding their predictive effects towards engagement. A cross-sectional self-administered online survey was conducted among scientists at non- university research institutions in Germany over a span of five weeks. The study showed that engagement could be divided into two different kinds: engagement in classic PR activities and direct engagement with the lay public. The factors that contributed most towards predicting intentions and engagement were the number of colleagues in the direct professional environment who engaged, moral obligations and the importance that is put on engagement. These results can now serve as guidelines for communication departments at the research institutions to help develop measures that aim at increasing engagement. (Less)
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author
Kramer, Katharina LU
supervisor
organization
course
SKPM08 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Science communication, public relations, theory of planned behaviour, scientists’ perception of communication, scientists’ participation, public engagement, Germany
language
English
id
8920512
date added to LUP
2017-08-28 12:04:24
date last changed
2017-08-28 12:04:24
@misc{8920512,
  abstract     = {In this globalised world, the interest of the general public in scientific knowledge is ever increasing. Research institutions and especially the scientists are more and more in demand to communicate their research findings and inform the general public. Surveys, however, suggest that the scientists’ engagement is lacking, as only a small amount of is actually engaging. This study explores key factors that lead scientists to engage in science communication activities. Built on the theory of planned behaviour by Fishbein and Ajzen (1975, 1991), attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control as well as intentions were examined regarding their predictive effects towards engagement. A cross-sectional self-administered online survey was conducted among scientists at non- university research institutions in Germany over a span of five weeks. The study showed that engagement could be divided into two different kinds: engagement in classic PR activities and direct engagement with the lay public. The factors that contributed most towards predicting intentions and engagement were the number of colleagues in the direct professional environment who engaged, moral obligations and the importance that is put on engagement. These results can now serve as guidelines for communication departments at the research institutions to help develop measures that aim at increasing engagement.},
  author       = {Kramer, Katharina},
  keyword      = {Science communication,public relations,theory of planned behaviour,scientists’ perception of communication,scientists’ participation,public engagement,Germany},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Exploring Scientists' Communication Behaviour - A Theory of Planned Behaviour Approach},
  year         = {2017},
}