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The Role of the National Institutional Framework for Land Tenure on Contract-Farming Public-Private Partnerships in Malawi: a Case Study of Two Sugarcane Outgrower Schemes

Hinde, Eleanor Grace Annie LU (2017) EKHS21 20171
Department of Economic History
Abstract
Public-private partnerships (PPPs) as a form of contract farming are increasing in number across Sub-Saharan Africa; providing a potential solution to the threat of food insecurity and stimulant of economic growth. Yet, the perceived extent to which the operations of contract-farming PPPs include original smallholders – inclusivity - is often questioned. There is currently little evidence of the effects of the national institutional framework on the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. Using two such partnerships – both sugarcane outgrower schemes in Malawi – this thesis reduces this gap in the literature. Outgrower schemes from Nkhotakota and Chikwawa Districts are analysed within the context of the Malawian land tenure framework and... (More)
Public-private partnerships (PPPs) as a form of contract farming are increasing in number across Sub-Saharan Africa; providing a potential solution to the threat of food insecurity and stimulant of economic growth. Yet, the perceived extent to which the operations of contract-farming PPPs include original smallholders – inclusivity - is often questioned. There is currently little evidence of the effects of the national institutional framework on the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. Using two such partnerships – both sugarcane outgrower schemes in Malawi – this thesis reduces this gap in the literature. Outgrower schemes from Nkhotakota and Chikwawa Districts are analysed within the context of the Malawian land tenure framework and government initiatives.

The current study has four main findings for the effects of the national institutional framework on the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 1) Land policies which fail to title individual users of customary land will likely result in less-inclusive contract-farming PPPs. 2) National land-valuation procedures which are unregulated by strict guidelines, and fail to recognise the market value of customary land have the potential effect of reducing inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 3) A well-enforced justice system may counteract, to an extent, these potential negative effects, thus supporting the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 4) These potential negative effects of land tenure on inclusivity may be exaggerated by government initiatives which actively promote agricultural investment into areas of customary land, and are under international pressure to do so. (Less)
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author
Hinde, Eleanor Grace Annie LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHS21 20171
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
contract farming, public-private partnerships, outgrower schemes, inclusivity, land tenure policy, agricultural development initiatives
language
English
id
8922299
date added to LUP
2017-08-07 10:33:34
date last changed
2017-08-07 10:33:34
@misc{8922299,
  abstract     = {Public-private partnerships (PPPs) as a form of contract farming are increasing in number across Sub-Saharan Africa; providing a potential solution to the threat of food insecurity and stimulant of economic growth. Yet, the perceived extent to which the operations of contract-farming PPPs include original smallholders – inclusivity - is often questioned. There is currently little evidence of the effects of the national institutional framework on the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. Using two such partnerships – both sugarcane outgrower schemes in Malawi – this thesis reduces this gap in the literature. Outgrower schemes from Nkhotakota and Chikwawa Districts are analysed within the context of the Malawian land tenure framework and government initiatives.

The current study has four main findings for the effects of the national institutional framework on the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 1) Land policies which fail to title individual users of customary land will likely result in less-inclusive contract-farming PPPs. 2) National land-valuation procedures which are unregulated by strict guidelines, and fail to recognise the market value of customary land have the potential effect of reducing inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 3) A well-enforced justice system may counteract, to an extent, these potential negative effects, thus supporting the inclusivity of contract-farming PPPs. 4) These potential negative effects of land tenure on inclusivity may be exaggerated by government initiatives which actively promote agricultural investment into areas of customary land, and are under international pressure to do so.},
  author       = {Hinde, Eleanor Grace Annie},
  keyword      = {contract farming,public-private partnerships,outgrower schemes,inclusivity,land tenure policy,agricultural development initiatives},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Role of the National Institutional Framework for Land Tenure on Contract-Farming Public-Private Partnerships in Malawi: a Case Study of Two Sugarcane Outgrower Schemes},
  year         = {2017},
}