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Disaster-induced Displacement: The Case of Small Island Developing States in the Pacific and the Caribbean

Plewa, Malte Paul LU and Koch Giese, Ida LU (2017) VBRM15 20171
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety
Abstract
In 2015, 19.2 million people have been internally displaced globally in the context of disasters (IDMC, 2016). This is more than twice the number of people who have been newly displaced by conflict in the same period (IDMC, 2016). The small island developing states (SIDS) in the Pacific and the Caribbean belong to the most hazard-prone regions of the world. Yet, the dynamics of disaster-induced displacement and the drivers of displacement risk in SIDS are not well understood. As current data collection methods are inappropriate, many cases of displacement remain unnoticed. To better understand displacement risk drivers, dynamics and current approaches to displacement in the Pacific and Caribbean, 34 interviews with stakeholders from the... (More)
In 2015, 19.2 million people have been internally displaced globally in the context of disasters (IDMC, 2016). This is more than twice the number of people who have been newly displaced by conflict in the same period (IDMC, 2016). The small island developing states (SIDS) in the Pacific and the Caribbean belong to the most hazard-prone regions of the world. Yet, the dynamics of disaster-induced displacement and the drivers of displacement risk in SIDS are not well understood. As current data collection methods are inappropriate, many cases of displacement remain unnoticed. To better understand displacement risk drivers, dynamics and current approaches to displacement in the Pacific and Caribbean, 34 interviews with stakeholders from the Caribbean and the Pacific have been conducted, together with a review of 30 disaster risk reduction (DRR), climate change adaptation (CCA) and development policies, focusing on their integration of displacement considerations. The results indicate that generally, Pacific island nations consider human mobility related issues much more thoroughly in their policies and plans than their Caribbean counterparts. Nevertheless, both regions show a general neglect of mobility-related issues in their DRR and CCA policies and plans. Based on the results, it is recommended that displacement considerations are integrated into national DRR and CCA policies and plans. Displacement should be tackled from two angles: risk reduction activities need to be developed which directly target displacement risk, and protection schemes to protect the human rights of those affected, and help to recreate the livelihoods, should be in place. (Less)
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author
Plewa, Malte Paul LU and Koch Giese, Ida LU
supervisor
organization
course
VBRM15 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Disasters, Displacement, Caribbean, Pacific, Climate Change, Migration
language
English
id
8922401
date added to LUP
2017-08-24 09:40:59
date last changed
2017-11-30 11:41:54
@misc{8922401,
  abstract     = {In 2015, 19.2 million people have been internally displaced globally in the context of disasters (IDMC, 2016). This is more than twice the number of people who have been newly displaced by conflict in the same period (IDMC, 2016). The small island developing states (SIDS) in the Pacific and the Caribbean belong to the most hazard-prone regions of the world. Yet, the dynamics of disaster-induced displacement and the drivers of displacement risk in SIDS are not well understood. As current data collection methods are inappropriate, many cases of displacement remain unnoticed. To better understand displacement risk drivers, dynamics and current approaches to displacement in the Pacific and Caribbean, 34 interviews with stakeholders from the Caribbean and the Pacific have been conducted, together with a review of 30 disaster risk reduction (DRR), climate change adaptation (CCA) and development policies, focusing on their integration of displacement considerations. The results indicate that generally, Pacific island nations consider human mobility related issues much more thoroughly in their policies and plans than their Caribbean counterparts. Nevertheless, both regions show a general neglect of mobility-related issues in their DRR and CCA policies and plans. Based on the results, it is recommended that displacement considerations are integrated into national DRR and CCA policies and plans. Displacement should be tackled from two angles: risk reduction activities need to be developed which directly target displacement risk, and protection schemes to protect the human rights of those affected, and help to recreate the livelihoods, should be in place.},
  author       = {Plewa, Malte Paul and Koch Giese, Ida},
  keyword      = {Disasters,Displacement,Caribbean,Pacific,Climate Change,Migration},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Disaster-induced Displacement: The Case of Small Island Developing States in the Pacific and the Caribbean},
  year         = {2017},
}