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Waste heat storage and utilization for the case of National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Uppsala, Sweden

Proshyn, Stanislav LU and Bulich, Iryna LU (2017) AEBM01 20171
Energy and Building Design
Abstract
The incineration furnace at National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden, runs approximately 2,150 hours a year and generates a large amount of waste heat. Some of this heat is partially recovered, and is used for heating one of the main buildings during the furnace operation. However, around 2,000 MWh is wasted annually due to unavailability of any storage system. This wasted heat is approximately equivalent to the heating demand of 160 average Swedish single-family houses.
This work aims to investigate different options allowing to use the waste heat as an energy source in neighbouring buildings and reduce the amount of purchased heating energy. The study initiates with the quantitative analysis of available waste heat and... (More)
The incineration furnace at National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden, runs approximately 2,150 hours a year and generates a large amount of waste heat. Some of this heat is partially recovered, and is used for heating one of the main buildings during the furnace operation. However, around 2,000 MWh is wasted annually due to unavailability of any storage system. This wasted heat is approximately equivalent to the heating demand of 160 average Swedish single-family houses.
This work aims to investigate different options allowing to use the waste heat as an energy source in neighbouring buildings and reduce the amount of purchased heating energy. The study initiates with the quantitative analysis of available waste heat and heating demand of nearby buildings. Based on this analysis, four options for the management and use of excess waste heat have been selected for detailed evaluation.
The first option considered in this work is to use a storage tank to provide the main building with heating during the furnace non-operating time. For this option, special attention has been paid to the tank sizing technique. The second option studied in detail in this work is to maximize the instantaneous use of waste heat by providing direct heating to nearby buildings. This implies the supply of waste heat directly to the buildings during the furnace operating time. In this context, a strategy has been developed to determine the optimal order for connecting different buildings depending on their demand profiles and distance from the furnace. In the third option, the instantaneous use of waste heat and hot water storage tanks has been studied simultaneously in various combinations. Finally, in the fourth option an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) system assisted by a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) has been considered for seasonal heat storage. The performance of the UTES and the GSHP system has been optimized by evaluating different strategies to maximise the source-side entering temperature to the heat pump.
All the above-mentioned options have been implemented in the building energy simulation program IDA ICE (Advanced level). For each option, the overall energy performance and corresponding energy savings have been evaluated. The economic feasibility of each option has been assessed and compared to other options based on life-cycle cost (LCCs) analysis. Overall, this study contributes to the understanding of heat management between different buildings and underlines the importance of demands and availability analysis to determine the optimal solution. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Today, a large amount of waste heat is produced as a by-product of industrial processes, human activities and other energy conversion processes. Unfortunately, at present, most of this waste heat is dissipated to the atmosphere. However, as illustrated by several recent studies, there is great potential in the utilization of the waste heat. On the same lines, this work also investigates the possibility of utilizing waste heat for an actual case study.
The study object considered in this work is the National Veterinary Institute (Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt, SVA) situated in Uppsala, Sweden. The facility generates approximately 3,600 MWh of heat annually as an incineration by-product. The heat is available for nine hours each... (More)
Today, a large amount of waste heat is produced as a by-product of industrial processes, human activities and other energy conversion processes. Unfortunately, at present, most of this waste heat is dissipated to the atmosphere. However, as illustrated by several recent studies, there is great potential in the utilization of the waste heat. On the same lines, this work also investigates the possibility of utilizing waste heat for an actual case study.
The study object considered in this work is the National Veterinary Institute (Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt, SVA) situated in Uppsala, Sweden. The facility generates approximately 3,600 MWh of heat annually as an incineration by-product. The heat is available for nine hours each working day. A part of the generated heat is used for heating the main SVA building. However, approximately 2,000 MWh is not used and, hence, is wasted every year. The amount of the wasted heat varies in time, but is largest during the summer period. In total, the wasted energy is enough to provide heating to over 160 single-family houses.
This work studies in detail four different solutions to use the available waste heat to provide heating to three adjacent SVA buildings. The first solution is to use water storage tanks to provide heating to the SVA main building when the incineration process is not operational and in turn direct heating from the furnace is not available. For this case, special attention has been paid to the appropriate sizing of storage tanks to utilize as much waste energy as possible and to ensure high economic profitability. The second solution considered in this work is to maximise the direct use of waste heat in the SVA buildings during the incinerator operating period. No storage has been considered for this option and the focus has been on finding the optimal order of connecting the four SVA buildings directly to the waste heat source. In the third solution, the first two solutions, i.e. direct use of waste heat and use of storage tank, respectively, have been studied simultaneously in various combinations. The fourth solution explores the possibility of using borehole thermal energy storage for seasonal storage of heat during summer months. In winter, the heat is extracted back using a ground-source heat pump. For this solution, the borehole thermal energy storage has been optimized to maximise the performance the ground-source.
The results of this study underscore the complexity in storing and using waste heat. The results obtained for a 15-year period suggest that despite all the advantages of energy storage, the direct use of heat (i.e. the second option) results in the largest savings to investment ratio and the shortest payback period. The third option, i.e. combination of direct waste heat and storage tank, is shown to be the second best option. It provides highest monetary savings when discounted to net present values, and has the second shortest payback period. Solution 1 (i.e. water storage tanks) and solution 4 (i.e. borehole thermal energy storage) both have the longest payback periods and result in smallest savings to investment ratios. However, if the analysis period is changed from 15 to 25 years, the borehole thermal energy storage and the ground-source heat pump system (i.e. the fourth option) turns out to be the most profitable solution. (Less)
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author
Proshyn, Stanislav LU and Bulich, Iryna LU
supervisor
organization
course
AEBM01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
waste heat, direct distribution, thermal energy storage, hot water storage tank, borehole seasonal storage, heat pump, IDA ICE plant modelling, savings-to-investment ratio, life-cycle costs
language
English
id
8923296
date added to LUP
2017-08-23 16:31:31
date last changed
2017-08-23 16:31:31
@misc{8923296,
  abstract     = {The incineration furnace at National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden, runs approximately 2,150 hours a year and generates a large amount of waste heat. Some of this heat is partially recovered, and is used for heating one of the main buildings during the furnace operation. However, around 2,000 MWh is wasted annually due to unavailability of any storage system. This wasted heat is approximately equivalent to the heating demand of 160 average Swedish single-family houses. 
This work aims to investigate different options allowing to use the waste heat as an energy source in neighbouring buildings and reduce the amount of purchased heating energy. The study initiates with the quantitative analysis of available waste heat and heating demand of nearby buildings. Based on this analysis, four options for the management and use of excess waste heat have been selected for detailed evaluation.
The first option considered in this work is to use a storage tank to provide the main building with heating during the furnace non-operating time. For this option, special attention has been paid to the tank sizing technique. The second option studied in detail in this work is to maximize the instantaneous use of waste heat by providing direct heating to nearby buildings. This implies the supply of waste heat directly to the buildings during the furnace operating time. In this context, a strategy has been developed to determine the optimal order for connecting different buildings depending on their demand profiles and distance from the furnace. In the third option, the instantaneous use of waste heat and hot water storage tanks has been studied simultaneously in various combinations. Finally, in the fourth option an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) system assisted by a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) has been considered for seasonal heat storage. The performance of the UTES and the GSHP system has been optimized by evaluating different strategies to maximise the source-side entering temperature to the heat pump.
All the above-mentioned options have been implemented in the building energy simulation program IDA ICE (Advanced level). For each option, the overall energy performance and corresponding energy savings have been evaluated. The economic feasibility of each option has been assessed and compared to other options based on life-cycle cost (LCCs) analysis. Overall, this study contributes to the understanding of heat management between different buildings and underlines the importance of demands and availability analysis to determine the optimal solution.},
  author       = {Proshyn, Stanislav and Bulich, Iryna},
  keyword      = {waste heat,direct distribution,thermal energy storage,hot water storage tank,borehole seasonal storage,heat pump,IDA ICE plant modelling,savings-to-investment ratio,life-cycle costs},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Waste heat storage and utilization for the case of National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Uppsala, Sweden},
  year         = {2017},
}