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Less is less? – A comparative case study of Finnish NGOs’ exit strategies after the cut of Finland's official development assistance in 2016

Sene, Mariem Nicole LU (2017) SIMV29 20171
Department of Political Science
Graduate School
Abstract
The relationship between a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) and a government can be unpredictable, which could complicate the NGO’s operations in a resource dependent environment. If a government decides to abruptly cut its official development assistance allocation towards the civil society; does that not only reflect the government’s new development policy but it might also jeopardize the continuity of civil society organizations’ activities. This research is a qualitative and comparative study of three Finnish NGOs that are partner organizations with the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and that were affected by the government of Finland’s decision to reduce its official development assistance (ODA) by 43% in 2016. Since... (More)
The relationship between a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) and a government can be unpredictable, which could complicate the NGO’s operations in a resource dependent environment. If a government decides to abruptly cut its official development assistance allocation towards the civil society; does that not only reflect the government’s new development policy but it might also jeopardize the continuity of civil society organizations’ activities. This research is a qualitative and comparative study of three Finnish NGOs that are partner organizations with the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and that were affected by the government of Finland’s decision to reduce its official development assistance (ODA) by 43% in 2016. Since Finland has been generally acknowledged as a reliable donor; its decision to cut official development assistance abruptly raised concerns about the abilities of Finnish NGOs to compensate for the government funding in such a short notice. Before the cut was effected, all three NGOs had released different predictions in the media, ranging from quite negative to relatively optimistic, about their likelihood to be able to continue their development programs and projects that were previously funded by the government. With the method of structured, focused comparison and using the theoretical lens of Resource Dependency Theory; the focus of this study is to examine the three NGOs’ exit strategies in terms of the continuation of their development activities after the abrupt cut of government funding, and to find out the importance of other sources of funding and partnerships with other development organizations when compensating for the official development assistance allocated by the government of Finland that has been an important source of funding with little conditionalities. The study finds that while partnerships are useful in certain cases, regarding the transferring of certain development activities over to other organizations; early planning to increase funding outside of the government’s financing as well as having diverse funding sources without conditions are vital for successful exit strategies. (Less)
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author
Sene, Mariem Nicole LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV29 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Resource Dependence Theory, Exit strategy, Donor exit, Development aid cut, Finnish development policy, Finnish Civil Society, Sustainability
language
English
id
8924541
date added to LUP
2017-11-16 11:58:39
date last changed
2020-05-25 09:56:23
@misc{8924541,
  abstract     = {The relationship between a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) and a government can be unpredictable, which could complicate the NGO’s operations in a resource dependent environment. If a government decides to abruptly cut its official development assistance allocation towards the civil society; does that not only reflect the government’s new development policy but it might also jeopardize the continuity of civil society organizations’ activities. This research is a qualitative and comparative study of three Finnish NGOs that are partner organizations with the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and that were affected by the government of Finland’s decision to reduce its official development assistance (ODA) by 43% in 2016. Since Finland has been generally acknowledged as a reliable donor; its decision to cut official development assistance abruptly raised concerns about the abilities of Finnish NGOs to compensate for the government funding in such a short notice. Before the cut was effected, all three NGOs had released different predictions in the media, ranging from quite negative to relatively optimistic, about their likelihood to be able to continue their development programs and projects that were previously funded by the government. With the method of structured, focused comparison and using the theoretical lens of Resource Dependency Theory; the focus of this study is to examine the three NGOs’ exit strategies in terms of the continuation of their development activities after the abrupt cut of government funding, and to find out the importance of other sources of funding and partnerships with other development organizations when compensating for the official development assistance allocated by the government of Finland that has been an important source of funding with little conditionalities. The study finds that while partnerships are useful in certain cases, regarding the transferring of certain development activities over to other organizations; early planning to increase funding outside of the government’s financing as well as having diverse funding sources without conditions are vital for successful exit strategies.},
  author       = {Sene, Mariem Nicole},
  keyword      = {Resource Dependence Theory,Exit strategy,Donor exit,Development aid cut,Finnish development policy,Finnish Civil Society,Sustainability},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Less is less? – A comparative case study of Finnish NGOs’ exit strategies after the cut of Finland's official development assistance in 2016},
  year         = {2017},
}