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”Who cares about us brown people?” - En narrativanalys av den kanadensiska ursprungsbefolkningens egna berättelser om polisiärt våld och diskriminering mot inhemska kvinnor

Ekholm, Ellinor LU (2018) MRSK61 20172
Human Rights Studies
Abstract
The aim of this essay is to visualize the oppression against indigenous women and girls in Canada, using an intersectional perspective with focus on the race, gender and nation. This is done through a narrative analysis of the Canadian indigenous peoples own stories of police violence and discrimination against indigenous women and girls. The primary material for this essay consists of stories, evidence and interviews concerning the police violence against indigenous women and girls in Canada, written and executed by The Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women (2014) and Human Rights Watch (2017). The study has been done using a narrative analysis focusing primarily on personal stories, based on William Labov’s six-part... (More)
The aim of this essay is to visualize the oppression against indigenous women and girls in Canada, using an intersectional perspective with focus on the race, gender and nation. This is done through a narrative analysis of the Canadian indigenous peoples own stories of police violence and discrimination against indigenous women and girls. The primary material for this essay consists of stories, evidence and interviews concerning the police violence against indigenous women and girls in Canada, written and executed by The Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women (2014) and Human Rights Watch (2017). The study has been done using a narrative analysis focusing primarily on personal stories, based on William Labov’s six-part model. Using Labov’s six-part model, the essay has focused on identifying six different narrative categories: abstract, orientation, complicating action, evaluation, result and coda. For a deeper analysis of indigenous peoples own stories, a seventh element has been added to this model, namely: stylistic descriptions. The main narratives identified in the essay consist of narratives that reveal sexual abuse and violations, physical abuse, racist and nationalist narratives as well as narrative that reveal various power structures. In summary have the results of the analysis visualized the oppression against indigenous women and girls through, among other things, the use of the terms “Indian” and “prostitute” to describe indigenous women. The results presented in the analysis have also illustrated how the multiple categories of indigenous women and girls affect the police’s behavior against them. (Less)
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author
Ekholm, Ellinor LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSK61 20172
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Canada, indigenous, women, police, violence, power, sexual abuse, intersectionality, narrative analysis, life stories
language
Swedish
id
8931230
date added to LUP
2018-03-14 09:13:15
date last changed
2018-03-14 09:13:15
@misc{8931230,
  abstract     = {The aim of this essay is to visualize the oppression against indigenous women and girls in Canada, using an intersectional perspective with focus on the race, gender and nation. This is done through a narrative analysis of the Canadian indigenous peoples own stories of police violence and discrimination against indigenous women and girls. The primary material for this essay consists of stories, evidence and interviews concerning the police violence against indigenous women and girls in Canada, written and executed by The Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women (2014) and Human Rights Watch (2017). The study has been done using a narrative analysis focusing primarily on personal stories, based on William Labov’s six-part model. Using Labov’s six-part model, the essay has focused on identifying six different narrative categories: abstract, orientation, complicating action, evaluation, result and coda. For a deeper analysis of indigenous peoples own stories, a seventh element has been added to this model, namely: stylistic descriptions. The main narratives identified in the essay consist of narratives that reveal sexual abuse and violations, physical abuse, racist and nationalist narratives as well as narrative that reveal various power structures. In summary have the results of the analysis visualized the oppression against indigenous women and girls through, among other things, the use of the terms “Indian” and “prostitute” to describe indigenous women. The results presented in the analysis have also illustrated how the multiple categories of indigenous women and girls affect the police’s behavior against them.},
  author       = {Ekholm, Ellinor},
  keyword      = {Canada,indigenous,women,police,violence,power,sexual abuse,intersectionality,narrative analysis,life stories},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {”Who cares about us brown people?” - En narrativanalys av den kanadensiska ursprungsbefolkningens egna berättelser om polisiärt våld och diskriminering mot inhemska kvinnor},
  year         = {2018},
}