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Time preferences and community-based conservation: Insights from elephant patrolling efforts in Aras Napal, Indonesia

Rydberg, Helena LU (2018) NEKH03 20172
Department of Economics
Abstract
This study took place in an Indonesian village in Aras Napal, North Sumatra, which previously has been involved in an elephant patrolling conservation program to mitigate human-elephant conflicts and protect the neighboring Leuser National Park. The study examines the villager’s individual and social time preferences, particularly comparing those who were actively involved in the elephant patrolling unit and those who were not. Quantitative data from a sample of 50 villagers was collected. The survey used comparable index measures for individual and social patience, consisting of subjectively self-assessed time preferences and revealed time preferences through staircase choice experiments. The results suggest that the villagers tend to be... (More)
This study took place in an Indonesian village in Aras Napal, North Sumatra, which previously has been involved in an elephant patrolling conservation program to mitigate human-elephant conflicts and protect the neighboring Leuser National Park. The study examines the villager’s individual and social time preferences, particularly comparing those who were actively involved in the elephant patrolling unit and those who were not. Quantitative data from a sample of 50 villagers was collected. The survey used comparable index measures for individual and social patience, consisting of subjectively self-assessed time preferences and revealed time preferences through staircase choice experiments. The results suggest that the villagers tend to be less patient for individual benefits than for social benefits. The finding was especially significant among those who had not been actively involved in the elephant patrolling unit. The study also showed that there is a discrepancy between the measures of self-assessed time preferences and revealed time
preferences, indicating that the villagers act in discordance with their intentions for intertemporal choices. I argue that these findings are relevant for sustainable development policy and research as more people will be expected to face
environmental poverty and degradation in the future. Studying time preferences in relation to conservation efforts will help us understand the difficulties in uniting farsighted environmental patience with the urgency for environmental services to satisfy immediate needs. (Less)
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author
Rydberg, Helena LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKH03 20172
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Indonesia, individual time preferences, social time preferences, patience, community-based conservation
language
English
id
8934100
date added to LUP
2018-02-14 18:38:16
date last changed
2018-05-03 08:43:46
@misc{8934100,
  abstract     = {This study took place in an Indonesian village in Aras Napal, North Sumatra, which previously has been involved in an elephant patrolling conservation program to mitigate human-elephant conflicts and protect the neighboring Leuser National Park. The study examines the villager’s individual and social time preferences, particularly comparing those who were actively involved in the elephant patrolling unit and those who were not. Quantitative data from a sample of 50 villagers was collected. The survey used comparable index measures for individual and social patience, consisting of subjectively self-assessed time preferences and revealed time preferences through staircase choice experiments. The results suggest that the villagers tend to be less patient for individual benefits than for social benefits. The finding was especially significant among those who had not been actively involved in the elephant patrolling unit. The study also showed that there is a discrepancy between the measures of self-assessed time preferences and revealed time
preferences, indicating that the villagers act in discordance with their intentions for intertemporal choices. I argue that these findings are relevant for sustainable development policy and research as more people will be expected to face
environmental poverty and degradation in the future. Studying time preferences in relation to conservation efforts will help us understand the difficulties in uniting farsighted environmental patience with the urgency for environmental services to satisfy immediate needs.},
  author       = {Rydberg, Helena},
  keyword      = {Indonesia,individual time preferences,social time preferences,patience,community-based conservation},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Time preferences and community-based conservation: Insights from elephant patrolling efforts in Aras Napal, Indonesia},
  year         = {2018},
}