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Airborne

Knutson, Kornelia (2015) In Diploma work IDEM05 20152
Industrial Design
Abstract
Airborne diseases are spread when droplets containing
pathogens, viruses and/or bacteria, are expelled into
the air due to coughing, sneezing or talking. These
droplets, or aerosols, can remain suspended in the
air for quite some time in contained environments.
Diseases are also transmitted by close physical contact
and by rubbing eyes, mouth and nose after touching a
contaminated surface.

Radically increased mobility among humans, our treatment
of animals and climate changes have increased
the frequency of epidemics and the probability that a
novel or mutated virus can spread rapidly. With the help
of WHO and a high level of international collaboration
and transparency, more alarms of pandemic alerts will
be heard.

The... (More)
Airborne diseases are spread when droplets containing
pathogens, viruses and/or bacteria, are expelled into
the air due to coughing, sneezing or talking. These
droplets, or aerosols, can remain suspended in the
air for quite some time in contained environments.
Diseases are also transmitted by close physical contact
and by rubbing eyes, mouth and nose after touching a
contaminated surface.

Radically increased mobility among humans, our treatment
of animals and climate changes have increased
the frequency of epidemics and the probability that a
novel or mutated virus can spread rapidly. With the help
of WHO and a high level of international collaboration
and transparency, more alarms of pandemic alerts will
be heard.

The research of this topic begun with news articles about
current viral events and the bigger picture; pandemics.
This was accompanied by a deeper dive into the world
of viruses and airborne diseases by the help of scientific
articles. Interviews with experts in the field; a Surgeon,
Infectious Disease Specialist, Infection Control
Practitioner and a Health Care Hygiene Specialist lead
to an understanding of why today’s respiratory masks
are not efficient enough and why we are not relying on
physical barriers today. The specialists could provide
with more scientific articles on the topic of constraints
and threats with respirators and also when and where
the risks of transmission occurs. Microorganisms can
penetrate through respirator filters, sealing surfaces or
other parts of the respirator. Wearing disposable and
reusable respirators causes difficulties in breathing
and communicating. The chosen strategy was to avoid
a health threat rather than curing a symptom. The
intended target group is individuals whom due to their
profession are exposed to many others while being in
a confined space. These people could be a danger to
others should they become infectious themselves.

The conceptual respirator was developed firstly by
sketching and by making rough prototypes for testing.
The final concept can be reused for weeks with
disposable filters and a full face piece respirator and it
prevents the three ways of transmission. The respirator
consists of a lightweight plastic visor which is combined
with adhesive and stretchy silicone. The soft and gentle
adhesive edges makes the respirator more effective and
safe than disposable ones by completely sealing the
edges to the face. Adhesive silicone is reattachable and
reusable. This also prohibits casual and easy donning
and doffing, which is linked to a higher risk of user
error and contracting diseases. This new user scenario
instead is in need of a mirror and sink and the donning
and doffing therefor encourages a ritual of adequate
hygiene of both hands and respirator.

The impact of air travel on the spread of infectious
diseases has given rise to considerable concern
however limited research. During the early phases of
a pandemic, strategies that rely on physical barriers
will be more prominent and respiratory protection
has been largely overlooked. A generally neglected
possible portal of entry for viruses is the conjunctiva.
Modern research on nanofibrous filtering material is
welcomed news, as well as the aim to provide adequate
information to the public in time. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Knutson, Kornelia
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Luftburen
course
IDEM05 20152
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
Diploma work
report number
ISRN: LUT-DVIDE/ EX--15/50257--SE
language
English
id
8934803
date added to LUP
2018-02-02 14:16:51
date last changed
2018-02-02 14:16:51
@misc{8934803,
  abstract     = {Airborne diseases are spread when droplets containing
pathogens, viruses and/or bacteria, are expelled into
the air due to coughing, sneezing or talking. These
droplets, or aerosols, can remain suspended in the
air for quite some time in contained environments.
Diseases are also transmitted by close physical contact
and by rubbing eyes, mouth and nose after touching a
contaminated surface.

Radically increased mobility among humans, our treatment
of animals and climate changes have increased
the frequency of epidemics and the probability that a
novel or mutated virus can spread rapidly. With the help
of WHO and a high level of international collaboration
and transparency, more alarms of pandemic alerts will
be heard.

The research of this topic begun with news articles about
current viral events and the bigger picture; pandemics.
This was accompanied by a deeper dive into the world
of viruses and airborne diseases by the help of scientific
articles. Interviews with experts in the field; a Surgeon,
Infectious Disease Specialist, Infection Control
Practitioner and a Health Care Hygiene Specialist lead
to an understanding of why today’s respiratory masks
are not efficient enough and why we are not relying on
physical barriers today. The specialists could provide
with more scientific articles on the topic of constraints
and threats with respirators and also when and where
the risks of transmission occurs. Microorganisms can
penetrate through respirator filters, sealing surfaces or
other parts of the respirator. Wearing disposable and
reusable respirators causes difficulties in breathing
and communicating. The chosen strategy was to avoid
a health threat rather than curing a symptom. The
intended target group is individuals whom due to their
profession are exposed to many others while being in
a confined space. These people could be a danger to
others should they become infectious themselves.

The conceptual respirator was developed firstly by
sketching and by making rough prototypes for testing.
The final concept can be reused for weeks with
disposable filters and a full face piece respirator and it
prevents the three ways of transmission. The respirator
consists of a lightweight plastic visor which is combined
with adhesive and stretchy silicone. The soft and gentle
adhesive edges makes the respirator more effective and
safe than disposable ones by completely sealing the
edges to the face. Adhesive silicone is reattachable and
reusable. This also prohibits casual and easy donning
and doffing, which is linked to a higher risk of user
error and contracting diseases. This new user scenario
instead is in need of a mirror and sink and the donning
and doffing therefor encourages a ritual of adequate
hygiene of both hands and respirator.

The impact of air travel on the spread of infectious
diseases has given rise to considerable concern
however limited research. During the early phases of
a pandemic, strategies that rely on physical barriers
will be more prominent and respiratory protection
has been largely overlooked. A generally neglected
possible portal of entry for viruses is the conjunctiva.
Modern research on nanofibrous filtering material is
welcomed news, as well as the aim to provide adequate
information to the public in time.},
  author       = {Knutson, Kornelia},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Diploma work},
  title        = {Airborne},
  year         = {2015},
}