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The phenomenology of eye movement intentions and their disruption in goal-directed actions

Roszko, Maximilian LU (2017) KOGM20 20171
Cognitive Science
Abstract
Many modern psychological theories still assume that humans know about themselves to a wide and accurate extent, in line with the early classical cognitive frameworks. Other competing frameworks, such as dynamic cognition, propose that intelligent behavior can arise from an interaction between the brain, body, and environment, without the need of manipulating explicitly represented knowledge-states. Intentions, i.e. the dispositions to do a specific action, are one such type of mental events that is assumed to be internally monitored to an accurate extent, and is heavily involved in theories modeling goal-directed action. The dynamic framework suggests that there is no reason to assume that humans would naturally have high introspective... (More)
Many modern psychological theories still assume that humans know about themselves to a wide and accurate extent, in line with the early classical cognitive frameworks. Other competing frameworks, such as dynamic cognition, propose that intelligent behavior can arise from an interaction between the brain, body, and environment, without the need of manipulating explicitly represented knowledge-states. Intentions, i.e. the dispositions to do a specific action, are one such type of mental events that is assumed to be internally monitored to an accurate extent, and is heavily involved in theories modeling goal-directed action. The dynamic framework suggests that there is no reason to assume that humans would naturally have high introspective access to intentions, or are in need of them when making goal-directed actions in the first place. In this study, the extent to which we monitor eye movement intentions, i.e. the intentions to shift one’s gaze towards a specific location, and whether they can be expressed in conscious experience, is investigated. A forced-choice decision task was developed where a pair of faces moved systematically across
the screen. In some trials, the pair of faces moved additionally as soon as the participants attempted to gaze at the face which was in the front of the movement direction, such that the
participants would never see the ’front’ face within the center of their gaze. The results of the experiment suggest that humans in general do not monitor their eye movement intentions
in a way that allows for mismatches to be consciously experienced and expressed. It was also possible to bias participants into not choosing the alternative that escaped the center of
their gaze, if both faces were highly attractive, and doing so without the participants being aware of the manipulation. The results suggest that oculomotor control is another cognitive
domain that humans have low access to, and that theoretical models that assume intentions to be central in goal-directed action need to be revised. (Less)
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author
Roszko, Maximilian LU
supervisor
organization
course
KOGM20 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
cognitive science, eye movements, intentions, goal-directed actions, awareness, decision-making
language
English
id
8936166
date added to LUP
2018-05-18 10:02:23
date last changed
2018-05-18 10:02:23
@misc{8936166,
  abstract     = {Many modern psychological theories still assume that humans know about themselves to a wide and accurate extent, in line with the early classical cognitive frameworks. Other competing frameworks, such as dynamic cognition, propose that intelligent behavior can arise from an interaction between the brain, body, and environment, without the need of manipulating explicitly represented knowledge-states. Intentions, i.e. the dispositions to do a specific action, are one such type of mental events that is assumed to be internally monitored to an accurate extent, and is heavily involved in theories modeling goal-directed action. The dynamic framework suggests that there is no reason to assume that humans would naturally have high introspective access to intentions, or are in need of them when making goal-directed actions in the first place. In this study, the extent to which we monitor eye movement intentions, i.e. the intentions to shift one’s gaze towards a specific location, and whether they can be expressed in conscious experience, is investigated. A forced-choice decision task was developed where a pair of faces moved systematically across
the screen. In some trials, the pair of faces moved additionally as soon as the participants attempted to gaze at the face which was in the front of the movement direction, such that the
participants would never see the ’front’ face within the center of their gaze. The results of the experiment suggest that humans in general do not monitor their eye movement intentions
in a way that allows for mismatches to be consciously experienced and expressed. It was also possible to bias participants into not choosing the alternative that escaped the center of
their gaze, if both faces were highly attractive, and doing so without the participants being aware of the manipulation. The results suggest that oculomotor control is another cognitive
domain that humans have low access to, and that theoretical models that assume intentions to be central in goal-directed action need to be revised.},
  author       = {Roszko, Maximilian},
  keyword      = {cognitive science,eye movements,intentions,goal-directed actions,awareness,decision-making},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The phenomenology of eye movement intentions and their disruption in goal-directed actions},
  year         = {2017},
}