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Putting the power in plants : using green infrastructure to reduce nonpoint source pollution in aquatic ecosystems in the urban center of Dublin

Mazar, Tessa LU (2018) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM02 20181
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Coastal ecosystems are some of the most productive, and most at risk, in the world. These ecosystems are at risk due to the high levels of pollution entering the system. Most of this pollution comes from either run off or atmospheric deposition. There are a few ways in which this pollution could be tackled without a complete overhaul of societal systems, the most common solutions being grey or green infrastructure. Green infrastructure is often preferable to grey infrastructure due to its adaptability, longevity, and the multiple benefits it can bring to an area. Using Dublin as a representative urban area, this paper makes a case for reducing nonpoint source pollution through the implementation of green infrastructure methods. Complexity... (More)
Coastal ecosystems are some of the most productive, and most at risk, in the world. These ecosystems are at risk due to the high levels of pollution entering the system. Most of this pollution comes from either run off or atmospheric deposition. There are a few ways in which this pollution could be tackled without a complete overhaul of societal systems, the most common solutions being grey or green infrastructure. Green infrastructure is often preferable to grey infrastructure due to its adaptability, longevity, and the multiple benefits it can bring to an area. Using Dublin as a representative urban area, this paper makes a case for reducing nonpoint source pollution through the implementation of green infrastructure methods. Complexity theory is highlighted to show how cities are complex adaptive systems that require flexible infrastructure to adapt to the evolving problems. DPSIR is used as a framework in this thesis to identify the main causes of pollution. qGIS is utilized to show the different land use in Dublin and potential areas for green infrastructure-based projects. Phytoremediation, green roofs, and living green walls are suggested to be implemented to reduce the flooding potential of the city and provide additional pollution minimizing qualities. In addition, a combination top-down and bottom-up approach for adjusting the social norms to rely more heavily on green infrastructure in the future is suggested. (Less)
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author
Mazar, Tessa LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM02 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
green infrastructure, Dublin, non-point source pollution, urban run-off, sustainability science
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2018:003
language
English
id
8945767
date added to LUP
2018-06-07 09:02:05
date last changed
2018-06-07 09:02:05
@misc{8945767,
  abstract     = {Coastal ecosystems are some of the most productive, and most at risk, in the world. These ecosystems are at risk due to the high levels of pollution entering the system. Most of this pollution comes from either run off or atmospheric deposition. There are a few ways in which this pollution could be tackled without a complete overhaul of societal systems, the most common solutions being grey or green infrastructure. Green infrastructure is often preferable to grey infrastructure due to its adaptability, longevity, and the multiple benefits it can bring to an area. Using Dublin as a representative urban area, this paper makes a case for reducing nonpoint source pollution through the implementation of green infrastructure methods. Complexity theory is highlighted to show how cities are complex adaptive systems that require flexible infrastructure to adapt to the evolving problems. DPSIR is used as a framework in this thesis to identify the main causes of pollution. qGIS is utilized to show the different land use in Dublin and potential areas for green infrastructure-based projects. Phytoremediation, green roofs, and living green walls are suggested to be implemented to reduce the flooding potential of the city and provide additional pollution minimizing qualities. In addition, a combination top-down and bottom-up approach for adjusting the social norms to rely more heavily on green infrastructure in the future is suggested.},
  author       = {Mazar, Tessa},
  keyword      = {green infrastructure,Dublin,non-point source pollution,urban run-off,sustainability science},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Putting the power in plants : using green infrastructure to reduce nonpoint source pollution in aquatic ecosystems in the urban center of Dublin},
  year         = {2018},
}