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Reproductive and Sexual Health in Sub-Saharan Africa: The determinants of contraceptive knowledge and use in Malawi and Cameroon

Valverde Pedrique, Karin LU (2018) EKHS42 20181
Department of Economic History
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to shed light on the socio-cultural and economic norms and practices that influence the knowledge and use of contraceptives and family planning services. To go further, we explore the role of media and the impact of attitudes towards domestic violence. Focusing on Cameroon and Malawi, we review the economic development and evolution of key indicators of Sexual and Reproductive Health using aggregate data from the World Bank. Subsequently, an empirical study of the determinants of knowledge and use of modern contraceptive methods (such as condoms, the pill, IUD) and those of unmet needs for spacing and limiting pregnancies, using individual-level data from the Demographic and Health Survey. The results show that... (More)
The purpose of this study is to shed light on the socio-cultural and economic norms and practices that influence the knowledge and use of contraceptives and family planning services. To go further, we explore the role of media and the impact of attitudes towards domestic violence. Focusing on Cameroon and Malawi, we review the economic development and evolution of key indicators of Sexual and Reproductive Health using aggregate data from the World Bank. Subsequently, an empirical study of the determinants of knowledge and use of modern contraceptive methods (such as condoms, the pill, IUD) and those of unmet needs for spacing and limiting pregnancies, using individual-level data from the Demographic and Health Survey. The results show that socio-economic factors are leading determinants of contraceptive use and knowledge, while they decrease the odds of having unmet needs. In Cameroon, women are less likely to know about modern methods while in Malawi they have higher odds when controlling for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. In some cases having heard about Family Planning on television or the radio increased the odds of knowing and using modern methods, and lowered the odds of unmet needs. This shows that the mechanisms behind access to information and safeguarding of SRH health are more complicated than the initial theories thought. It further indicates that programs and interventions should be based on regional context and culture. (Less)
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author
Valverde Pedrique, Karin LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHS42 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Determinants, Sexual and reproductive health, contraceptive methods, unmet needs
language
English
id
8951709
date added to LUP
2018-06-21 13:47:11
date last changed
2018-06-21 13:47:11
@misc{8951709,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study is to shed light on the socio-cultural and economic norms and practices that influence the knowledge and use of contraceptives and family planning services. To go further, we explore the role of media and the impact of attitudes towards domestic violence. Focusing on Cameroon and Malawi, we review the economic development and evolution of key indicators of Sexual and Reproductive Health using aggregate data from the World Bank. Subsequently, an empirical study of the determinants of knowledge and use of modern contraceptive methods (such as condoms, the pill, IUD) and those of unmet needs for spacing and limiting pregnancies, using individual-level data from the Demographic and Health Survey. The results show that socio-economic factors are leading determinants of contraceptive use and knowledge, while they decrease the odds of having unmet needs. In Cameroon, women are less likely to know about modern methods while in Malawi they have higher odds when controlling for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. In some cases having heard about Family Planning on television or the radio increased the odds of knowing and using modern methods, and lowered the odds of unmet needs. This shows that the mechanisms behind access to information and safeguarding of SRH health are more complicated than the initial theories thought. It further indicates that programs and interventions should be based on regional context and culture.},
  author       = {Valverde Pedrique, Karin},
  keyword      = {Determinants,Sexual and reproductive health,contraceptive methods,unmet needs},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Reproductive and Sexual Health in Sub-Saharan Africa: The determinants of contraceptive knowledge and use in Malawi and Cameroon},
  year         = {2018},
}