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In the traces of a crisis An individual-level analysis of the impact of the European sovereign debt crisis on voter participation in the 2014 European Parliament election

Sibinovic, Aleksandar LU (2018) STVM25 20181
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Elections to the European Parliament have since they were introduced in 1979 been, as scholars define it, a “second-order” election. They are typically as such characterized through the losses for national government parties, surge of smaller parties, low interest from the public in general and most of all low levels of voter participation. Expectations were therefore for once higher that the European Parliament elections in 2014 would prove to be different from previous experiences. One very important reason was the past years collective top-down experience in the European Union of going through and dealing with the European sovereign debt crisis. The aim for this thesis therefore became to perform an individual-level analysis using... (More)
Elections to the European Parliament have since they were introduced in 1979 been, as scholars define it, a “second-order” election. They are typically as such characterized through the losses for national government parties, surge of smaller parties, low interest from the public in general and most of all low levels of voter participation. Expectations were therefore for once higher that the European Parliament elections in 2014 would prove to be different from previous experiences. One very important reason was the past years collective top-down experience in the European Union of going through and dealing with the European sovereign debt crisis. The aim for this thesis therefore became to perform an individual-level analysis using logistic regression to determine what impact the crisis had on voter participation in a group of EU member states (Cyprus, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain) that were particularly affected by the crisis. The overall conclusion is that the crisis seems only to have had at best marginal positive effects on voter participation in these countries and that national political circumstances still determine much of the contents of these elections and the context under which they are held and conducted. (Less)
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author
Sibinovic, Aleksandar LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM25 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8955757
date added to LUP
2019-06-28 14:07:42
date last changed
2019-06-28 14:07:42
@misc{8955757,
  abstract     = {Elections to the European Parliament have since they were introduced in 1979 been, as scholars define it, a “second-order” election. They are typically as such characterized through the losses for national government parties, surge of smaller parties, low interest from the public in general and most of all low levels of voter participation. Expectations were therefore for once higher that the European Parliament elections in 2014 would prove to be different from previous experiences. One very important reason was the past years collective top-down experience in the European Union of going through and dealing with the European sovereign debt crisis. The aim for this thesis therefore became to perform an individual-level analysis using logistic regression to determine what impact the crisis had on voter participation in a group of EU member states (Cyprus, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain) that were particularly affected by the crisis. The overall conclusion is that the crisis seems only to have had at best marginal positive effects on voter participation in these countries and that national political circumstances still determine much of the contents of these elections and the context under which they are held and conducted.},
  author       = {Sibinovic, Aleksandar},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {In the traces of a crisis An individual-level analysis of the impact of the European sovereign debt crisis on voter participation in the 2014 European Parliament election},
  year         = {2018},
}