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Why North Korea Developed the Deadliest Weapon on Earth - Examining North Korea's nuclear weapons program through strategic issues in international crisis bargaining

Parling, Isabella LU (2019) STVK02 20182
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This paper is a qualitative case study on the interaction between the United States of America and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK or North Korea). The study examines the difficulties states face when bargaining, and draws conclusions based on theories of how the structural setting affects strategic choices when states seek security on the international arena. The paper examines signaling, commitment, and bargaining difficulties that arise from insecurity and credibility issues. The paper looks at statements made by representatives of the two countries as its primary material for conclusions. The paper further explains the difficulties in reaching international agreements, why nations like North Korea capitalizes on nuclear... (More)
This paper is a qualitative case study on the interaction between the United States of America and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK or North Korea). The study examines the difficulties states face when bargaining, and draws conclusions based on theories of how the structural setting affects strategic choices when states seek security on the international arena. The paper examines signaling, commitment, and bargaining difficulties that arise from insecurity and credibility issues. The paper looks at statements made by representatives of the two countries as its primary material for conclusions. The paper further explains the difficulties in reaching international agreements, why nations like North Korea capitalizes on nuclear weapons as a guarantor for legitimacy and security, and why the US and North Korea have failed to reach a settlement. In relating this to the main question of why there has not been an effective agreement in the crisis, the paper concludes that there exists a preferable agreement that both parties might prefer to war, but that they are unable to agree on such a settlement because of the distrust inherent in the anarchic system. (Less)
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author
Parling, Isabella LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK02 20182
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
North Korea, United States, nuclear weapons, bargaining issues, strategic choice
language
English
id
8965285
date added to LUP
2019-03-21 10:05:03
date last changed
2019-03-21 10:05:03
@misc{8965285,
  abstract     = {This paper is a qualitative case study on the interaction between the United States of America and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK or North Korea). The study examines the difficulties states face when bargaining, and draws conclusions based on theories of how the structural setting affects strategic choices when states seek security on the international arena. The paper examines signaling, commitment, and bargaining difficulties that arise from insecurity and credibility issues. The paper looks at statements made by representatives of the two countries as its primary material for conclusions. The paper further explains the difficulties in reaching international agreements, why nations like North Korea capitalizes on nuclear weapons as a guarantor for legitimacy and security, and why the US and North Korea have failed to reach a settlement. In relating this to the main question of why there has not been an effective agreement in the crisis, the paper concludes that there exists a preferable agreement that both parties might prefer to war, but that they are unable to agree on such a settlement because of the distrust inherent in the anarchic system.},
  author       = {Parling, Isabella},
  keyword      = {North Korea,United States,nuclear weapons,bargaining issues,strategic choice},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Why North Korea Developed the Deadliest Weapon on Earth - Examining North Korea's nuclear weapons program through strategic issues in international crisis bargaining},
  year         = {2019},
}