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Jak 1:13, 1 Kor 10:13 och πειρασμóς: Ett intertextuellt studium av Jakobsbrevet

Franke, Leonhard LU (2017) BIVM72 20171
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies
Abstract
This study applies the method of intertextuality to interpret a possible dependance of Jas 1:13 on 1
Cor 10:13. Key to this study has been to analyse the use of the word for ”test” or ”temptation”:
πειρασμóς, in the two texts'. The aim has been to understand how James uses Paul as a source to
further his theology, to see how he in a creative way by the rethoric method of aemulatio fuses 1
Cor 10:13 into his argument on the nature of temptation and the relation of testing/ temptations to
God. Margaret M. Mitchells intertextual analysis on James' use of Paul as a way to harmonise Paul
with himself are fundamental to my argument that the author of the letter of James really does use 1
Cor 10:13 in his argument about the danger of... (More)
This study applies the method of intertextuality to interpret a possible dependance of Jas 1:13 on 1
Cor 10:13. Key to this study has been to analyse the use of the word for ”test” or ”temptation”:
πειρασμóς, in the two texts'. The aim has been to understand how James uses Paul as a source to
further his theology, to see how he in a creative way by the rethoric method of aemulatio fuses 1
Cor 10:13 into his argument on the nature of temptation and the relation of testing/ temptations to
God. Margaret M. Mitchells intertextual analysis on James' use of Paul as a way to harmonise Paul
with himself are fundamental to my argument that the author of the letter of James really does use 1
Cor 10:13 in his argument about the danger of accusing God as a tempter in Jas 1:13. This
dissertation proposes that the letter of James makes a so called allusion, following the criteria on
íntertextuality by Stanley Porter and Robert Hays, in Jas 1:13 on 1 Cor 10:13 to correct what James
sees as a wrong way to describe the relation of our temptation and God as an agent. The fact that
James very probably uses aemulatio requires one to consider a large variety of texts as potential
sources, and this dissertation has tried to give a broad overview of the possible sources and the
structure of the argument in Jas 1:13, and hopefully this study has been able to, if not definitively
prove, then at least give a possibility as to how James might have incorporated a theology of Paul
and how he then refers to it in a oblique way. James seems to exhort his listeners to focus on their
own shortcomings, and uses the figure of Job from jewish legends to remind his listeners how a
godfearing man never blames God for his misfortunes, James instead considers temptation as
coming from within and the struggle of facing this is what gives one the laurels of victory and life.
Pauls saying in 1 Cor 10:13 is then according to this dissertation needed to be corrected and/ or
explained by James, this is the reason for the argument in Jas 1:13. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Franke, Leonhard LU
supervisor
organization
course
BIVM72 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Temptation, πειρασμóς, intertextuality, Jas 1:13, 1 Cor 10:13, defense of God.
language
English
id
8966764
date added to LUP
2019-01-16 14:37:30
date last changed
2019-01-16 14:37:30
@misc{8966764,
  abstract     = {This study applies the method of intertextuality to interpret a possible dependance of Jas 1:13 on 1
Cor 10:13. Key to this study has been to analyse the use of the word for ”test” or ”temptation”:
πειρασμóς, in the two texts'. The aim has been to understand how James uses Paul as a source to
further his theology, to see how he in a creative way by the rethoric method of aemulatio fuses 1
Cor 10:13 into his argument on the nature of temptation and the relation of testing/ temptations to
God. Margaret M. Mitchells intertextual analysis on James' use of Paul as a way to harmonise Paul
with himself are fundamental to my argument that the author of the letter of James really does use 1
Cor 10:13 in his argument about the danger of accusing God as a tempter in Jas 1:13. This
dissertation proposes that the letter of James makes a so called allusion, following the criteria on
íntertextuality by Stanley Porter and Robert Hays, in Jas 1:13 on 1 Cor 10:13 to correct what James
sees as a wrong way to describe the relation of our temptation and God as an agent. The fact that
James very probably uses aemulatio requires one to consider a large variety of texts as potential
sources, and this dissertation has tried to give a broad overview of the possible sources and the
structure of the argument in Jas 1:13, and hopefully this study has been able to, if not definitively
prove, then at least give a possibility as to how James might have incorporated a theology of Paul
and how he then refers to it in a oblique way. James seems to exhort his listeners to focus on their
own shortcomings, and uses the figure of Job from jewish legends to remind his listeners how a
godfearing man never blames God for his misfortunes, James instead considers temptation as
coming from within and the struggle of facing this is what gives one the laurels of victory and life.
Pauls saying in 1 Cor 10:13 is then according to this dissertation needed to be corrected and/ or
explained by James, this is the reason for the argument in Jas 1:13.},
  author       = {Franke, Leonhard},
  keyword      = {Temptation,πειρασμóς,intertextuality,Jas 1:13,1 Cor 10:13,defense of God.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Jak 1:13, 1 Kor 10:13 och πειρασμóς: Ett intertextuellt studium av Jakobsbrevet},
  year         = {2017},
}