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The Tale of Two Cities

Kapodistrias, Georgios LU (2019) STVK12 20191
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Race, space and inequality are three terms deeply interlaced into social systems. South Africa provides with a good case to study the relationship between the three, due to its unique and chronologically durable employment of those terms in all enclaves of public life. Colonialism and apartheid combined, led to the extensive abuse of space and race, undermining thus the overall social welfare under the authority of a white minority. Consequently, urban space in the case of Cape Town, still acts as an arena within which poverty and wealth are both racially and spatially motivated in patterns easily traced back to the city’s infamous past. To that, one can add challenges of the modern age, such as the professionalisation of employment, gated... (More)
Race, space and inequality are three terms deeply interlaced into social systems. South Africa provides with a good case to study the relationship between the three, due to its unique and chronologically durable employment of those terms in all enclaves of public life. Colonialism and apartheid combined, led to the extensive abuse of space and race, undermining thus the overall social welfare under the authority of a white minority. Consequently, urban space in the case of Cape Town, still acts as an arena within which poverty and wealth are both racially and spatially motivated in patterns easily traced back to the city’s infamous past. To that, one can add challenges of the modern age, such as the professionalisation of employment, gated communities, divisive housing projects et cetera, which only spur the existing tensions and further complicate the issue. The four main pillars analysed in this research, departing with the establishment of the status quo of racial residential segregation in Cape Town and the current housing policies, were the effects of mass evictions and urban development, the racial wealth gap and the post-Fordist economy. Those aspects have been viewed in light of the theory of racial space, in order for the continuous relevance of space and race in modern day Cape Town to be disclosed. Those sub-sections were analysed individually for their effects into society to be understood but also compared collectively for general patters to be drawn and their interconnectedness to be highlighted. (Less)
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author
Kapodistrias, Georgios LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20191
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
inequality, race, segregation, space, Cape Town, South Africa, urban development, apartheid, post-Fordism
language
English
id
8978041
date added to LUP
2019-09-06 09:11:04
date last changed
2019-09-06 09:11:09
@misc{8978041,
  abstract     = {Race, space and inequality are three terms deeply interlaced into social systems. South Africa provides with a good case to study the relationship between the three, due to its unique and chronologically durable employment of those terms in all enclaves of public life. Colonialism and apartheid combined, led to the extensive abuse of space and race, undermining thus the overall social welfare under the authority of a white minority. Consequently, urban space in the case of Cape Town, still acts as an arena within which poverty and wealth are both racially and spatially motivated in patterns easily traced back to the city’s infamous past. To that, one can add challenges of the modern age, such as the professionalisation of employment, gated communities, divisive housing projects et cetera, which only spur the existing tensions and further complicate the issue. The four main pillars analysed in this research, departing with the establishment of the status quo of racial residential segregation in Cape Town and the current housing policies, were the effects of mass evictions and urban development, the racial wealth gap and the post-Fordist economy. Those aspects have been viewed in light of the theory of racial space, in order for the continuous relevance of space and race in modern day Cape Town to be disclosed. Those sub-sections were analysed individually for their effects into society to be understood but also compared collectively for general patters to be drawn and their interconnectedness to be highlighted.},
  author       = {Kapodistrias, Georgios},
  keyword      = {inequality,race,segregation,space,Cape Town,South Africa,urban development,apartheid,post-Fordism},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Tale of Two Cities},
  year         = {2019},
}