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Addressing the gap between Hungary’s biomass potential and its current practices

Leitner, Dora LU (2019) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM02 20191
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
The European Union has committed to the ambitious target of increasing renewable energy sources by 27% in the energy consumption of member states by 2030. Biomass is considered as one of the most promising renewable energy resources to meet these goals. Currently, energy from biomass contributes up to two-thirds of the 28 member states primary combined renewable energy production. In Hungary, the total biomass resources amount to approximately 351-361 million tonnes, nearly two-thirds of all domestic renewable energy sources. However, only about one-sixth of these feasible biomass resources are actually used. In order to meet future energy demands and renewable targets, the sustainable production and utilization of biomass should be... (More)
The European Union has committed to the ambitious target of increasing renewable energy sources by 27% in the energy consumption of member states by 2030. Biomass is considered as one of the most promising renewable energy resources to meet these goals. Currently, energy from biomass contributes up to two-thirds of the 28 member states primary combined renewable energy production. In Hungary, the total biomass resources amount to approximately 351-361 million tonnes, nearly two-thirds of all domestic renewable energy sources. However, only about one-sixth of these feasible biomass resources are actually used. In order to meet future energy demands and renewable targets, the sustainable production and utilization of biomass should be increased. However, there are concerns raised about the sustainability of bioenergy from an ecological, environmental and socioeconomic view.

A proposed solution across literature, is the use of marginal lands to produce energy crops instead of using croplands and food-based feedstock for biomass. However, incentives for the use of marginal lands are insufficient in current Hungary’s environmental governance. This thesis investigates the failures associated with mainstreaming the use of marginal lands for biomass feedstock cultivation in Hungary. To achieve this, a systematic policy analysis was carried out on selected documents to get a better understanding about the Hungarian policy landscape on renewable energy resource management practices. Followed by interviews with representatives from multiple levels. The findings show that the main reasons behind not utilizing the available marginal lands are lack of supply chains, lack of efficient policy instruments and lack of political incentives. The concept of environmental mainstreaming was applied throughout the research results to identify the reasons for the unsuccessful practices in the bioenergy sector. The thesis puts forth the potential of using the National Rural Development Strategy for the environmental mainstreaming of marginal land use in decentralized energy systems. (Less)
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author
Leitner, Dora LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM02 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
biomass, marginal land, environmental mainstreaming, National Rural Development Programme, Hungary, Sustainability Science
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2019:018
language
English
id
8980207
date added to LUP
2019-06-10 10:44:54
date last changed
2019-06-10 10:44:54
@misc{8980207,
  abstract     = {The European Union has committed to the ambitious target of increasing renewable energy sources by 27% in the energy consumption of member states by 2030. Biomass is considered as one of the most promising renewable energy resources to meet these goals. Currently, energy from biomass contributes up to two-thirds of the 28 member states primary combined renewable energy production. In Hungary, the total biomass resources amount to approximately 351-361 million tonnes, nearly two-thirds of all domestic renewable energy sources. However, only about one-sixth of these feasible biomass resources are actually used. In order to meet future energy demands and renewable targets, the sustainable production and utilization of biomass should be increased. However, there are concerns raised about the sustainability of bioenergy from an ecological, environmental and socioeconomic view. 

A proposed solution across literature, is the use of marginal lands to produce energy crops instead of using croplands and food-based feedstock for biomass. However, incentives for the use of marginal lands are insufficient in current Hungary’s environmental governance. This thesis investigates the failures associated with mainstreaming the use of marginal lands for biomass feedstock cultivation in Hungary. To achieve this, a systematic policy analysis was carried out on selected documents to get a better understanding about the Hungarian policy landscape on renewable energy resource management practices. Followed by interviews with representatives from multiple levels. The findings show that the main reasons behind not utilizing the available marginal lands are lack of supply chains, lack of efficient policy instruments and lack of political incentives. The concept of environmental mainstreaming was applied throughout the research results to identify the reasons for the unsuccessful practices in the bioenergy sector. The thesis puts forth the potential of using the National Rural Development Strategy for the environmental mainstreaming of marginal land use in decentralized energy systems.},
  author       = {Leitner, Dora},
  keyword      = {biomass,marginal land,environmental mainstreaming,National Rural Development Programme,Hungary,Sustainability Science},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Addressing the gap between Hungary’s biomass potential and its current practices},
  year         = {2019},
}