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Renewable Energy Directive II: A case study in European Integration

Kelly, John Michael LU (2019) STVM23 20191
Department of Political Science
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine a tool used by the European Commission, that of the online consultation. This tool is used as a vehicle to gather information and knowledge from a broad group of stakeholders before the Commission formulates its policy. This tool has a two-fold benefit in that it underscores the EU’s transparency in decision-making, and it takes the pulse of various groups of actors. The specific online consultation is the second Renewable Energy (REDII) chosen because of the breadth and depth of the topic and its interest across all stakeholder segments.
To accomplish this goal, survey questions were selected, and data analyzed to discover the transparency of the Commission’s finding. The theoretical frameworks... (More)
The purpose of this paper is to examine a tool used by the European Commission, that of the online consultation. This tool is used as a vehicle to gather information and knowledge from a broad group of stakeholders before the Commission formulates its policy. This tool has a two-fold benefit in that it underscores the EU’s transparency in decision-making, and it takes the pulse of various groups of actors. The specific online consultation is the second Renewable Energy (REDII) chosen because of the breadth and depth of the topic and its interest across all stakeholder segments.
To accomplish this goal, survey questions were selected, and data analyzed to discover the transparency of the Commission’s finding. The theoretical frameworks used in this process of analysis are Neofunctionalism and Liberal Intergovernmentalism. These theories provide a broad cross-section for the sake of comparison. Moreover, it addresses the issue of how democratic, i.e. open to everyone, the process truly is. The data is interesting as it sees looks for whether or not there is a relationship between stakeholders and regions with regards to preferences. (Less)
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author
Kelly, John Michael LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM23 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
European Integration, Policy Formulation, Neofunctionalism, Liberal Intergovernmentalism, Online Consultation
language
English
id
8992151
date added to LUP
2019-09-06 09:20:01
date last changed
2019-09-06 09:20:06
@misc{8992151,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this paper is to examine a tool used by the European Commission, that of the online consultation. This tool is used as a vehicle to gather information and knowledge from a broad group of stakeholders before the Commission formulates its policy. This tool has a two-fold benefit in that it underscores the EU’s transparency in decision-making, and it takes the pulse of various groups of actors. The specific online consultation is the second Renewable Energy (REDII) chosen because of the breadth and depth of the topic and its interest across all stakeholder segments.
To accomplish this goal, survey questions were selected, and data analyzed to discover the transparency of the Commission’s finding. The theoretical frameworks used in this process of analysis are Neofunctionalism and Liberal Intergovernmentalism. These theories provide a broad cross-section for the sake of comparison. Moreover, it addresses the issue of how democratic, i.e. open to everyone, the process truly is. The data is interesting as it sees looks for whether or not there is a relationship between stakeholders and regions with regards to preferences.},
  author       = {Kelly, John Michael},
  keyword      = {European Integration,Policy Formulation,Neofunctionalism,Liberal Intergovernmentalism,Online Consultation},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Renewable Energy Directive II: A case study in European Integration},
  year         = {2019},
}