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Innovation Policies in East and Southeast Asia: A Comparative Case Study of Japan and Malaysia

Ndjave, Anaïs LU (2019) EKHK18 20191
Department of Economic History
Abstract
The East Asian region shows an interesting contrast when it comes to economic and technological development: on the one hand, North East Asia is more developed, on the other hand, Southeast Asia is less developed. Japan and Malaysia are both good examples of this contrast. Both of those countries’ governments have issued policies concerning how innovation can help the respective countries in achieving sustainable growth: Japan has the Fourth S&T Basic Plan, and Malaysia has the Second National Plan on Science & Technology. This thesis analyses both of the policies and compares their consequences on their countries’ economic and technological development. The study is based on the Mission-Oriented Innovation Policies theoretical framework... (More)
The East Asian region shows an interesting contrast when it comes to economic and technological development: on the one hand, North East Asia is more developed, on the other hand, Southeast Asia is less developed. Japan and Malaysia are both good examples of this contrast. Both of those countries’ governments have issued policies concerning how innovation can help the respective countries in achieving sustainable growth: Japan has the Fourth S&T Basic Plan, and Malaysia has the Second National Plan on Science & Technology. This thesis analyses both of the policies and compares their consequences on their countries’ economic and technological development. The study is based on the Mission-Oriented Innovation Policies theoretical framework as developed by Mazzucato, and the National Innovation System approach. The study finds that the countries’ policies differ in the extent to which they fulfilled the Mission-Oriented Innovation Policy framework and also to the extent to which they took into account their National Innovation Systems. Indeed, Japan’s policy fulfilled the MOIP requirements to a larger extent than Malaysia’s policy. Also, Japan’s policy was more adapted to its national innovation systems than Malaysia’s was. Although, neither one of the countries implemented all of the guidelines enumerated by their policies, it appears that Japan’s policy has still been more efficient in delivering technological development that translated to economic growth. The study concludes that this differences in policy is at the core of the differences in the countries’ economic and technological gap. (Less)
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author
Ndjave, Anaïs LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHK18 20191
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
English
id
8993136
date added to LUP
2020-05-12 09:13:34
date last changed
2020-05-12 09:13:34
@misc{8993136,
  abstract     = {The East Asian region shows an interesting contrast when it comes to economic and technological development: on the one hand, North East Asia is more developed, on the other hand, Southeast Asia is less developed. Japan and Malaysia are both good examples of this contrast. Both of those countries’ governments have issued policies concerning how innovation can help the respective countries in achieving sustainable growth: Japan has the Fourth S&T Basic Plan, and Malaysia has the Second National Plan on Science & Technology. This thesis analyses both of the policies and compares their consequences on their countries’ economic and technological development. The study is based on the Mission-Oriented Innovation Policies theoretical framework as developed by Mazzucato, and the National Innovation System approach. The study finds that the countries’ policies differ in the extent to which they fulfilled the Mission-Oriented Innovation Policy framework and also to the extent to which they took into account their National Innovation Systems. Indeed, Japan’s policy fulfilled the MOIP requirements to a larger extent than Malaysia’s policy. Also, Japan’s policy was more adapted to its national innovation systems than Malaysia’s was. Although, neither one of the countries implemented all of the guidelines enumerated by their policies, it appears that Japan’s policy has still been more efficient in delivering technological development that translated to economic growth. The study concludes that this differences in policy is at the core of the differences in the countries’ economic and technological gap.},
  author       = {Ndjave, Anaïs},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Innovation Policies in East and Southeast Asia: A Comparative Case Study of Japan and Malaysia},
  year         = {2019},
}