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Distributional effects of graduation from the EU’s GSP scheme: Can the GSP trade preference scheme have gender-specific effects?

Brunberg, Emma LU (2019) NEKP01 20191
Department of Economics
Abstract
The objective of the EU’s trade preference scheme GSP is to alleviate poverty, create jobs and promote international principles and values. Graduation is when a certain product group or beneficiary country loses its EU GSP trade preferences, after having reached a predefined level of development or having become too competitive. This thesis analyses the graduation mechanism in the EU GSP in terms of distributional effects. The ambition is to assess if certain industries have been impacted differently by the graduation policy, notably the industries in which the data suggests that women tend to work.

In order to examine such potential distributional effects, manufacturing industry data on employment levels is incorporated in a fixed... (More)
The objective of the EU’s trade preference scheme GSP is to alleviate poverty, create jobs and promote international principles and values. Graduation is when a certain product group or beneficiary country loses its EU GSP trade preferences, after having reached a predefined level of development or having become too competitive. This thesis analyses the graduation mechanism in the EU GSP in terms of distributional effects. The ambition is to assess if certain industries have been impacted differently by the graduation policy, notably the industries in which the data suggests that women tend to work.

In order to examine such potential distributional effects, manufacturing industry data on employment levels is incorporated in a fixed effects model in which the episodes of product graduation from the EU’s GSP function as a dummy variable. The baseline specification regressions cannot establish any relationship between graduation and manufacturing employment. The result of a subsample analysis shows weak evidence of a negative link between graduation and manufacturing employment in female-dominated industries, but the link is not robust. (Less)
Popular Abstract
The objective of the EU’s trade preference scheme GSP is to alleviate poverty, create jobs and promote international principles and values. Graduation is when a certain product group or beneficiary country loses its EU GSP trade preferences, after having reached a predefined level of development or having become too competitive. This thesis analyses the graduation mechanism in the EU GSP in terms of distributional effects. The ambition is to assess if certain industries have been impacted differently by the graduation policy, notably the industries in which the data suggests that women tend to work.

In order to examine such potential distributional effects, manufacturing industry data on employment levels is incorporated in a fixed... (More)
The objective of the EU’s trade preference scheme GSP is to alleviate poverty, create jobs and promote international principles and values. Graduation is when a certain product group or beneficiary country loses its EU GSP trade preferences, after having reached a predefined level of development or having become too competitive. This thesis analyses the graduation mechanism in the EU GSP in terms of distributional effects. The ambition is to assess if certain industries have been impacted differently by the graduation policy, notably the industries in which the data suggests that women tend to work.

In order to examine such potential distributional effects, manufacturing industry data on employment levels is incorporated in a fixed effects model in which the episodes of product graduation from the EU’s GSP function as a dummy variable. The baseline specification regressions cannot establish any relationship between graduation and manufacturing employment. The result of a subsample analysis shows weak evidence of a negative link between graduation and manufacturing employment in female-dominated industries, but the link is not robust. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Brunberg, Emma LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKP01 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
EU GSP, graduation, manufacturing employment, fixed effects
language
English
id
8994416
date added to LUP
2020-03-10 10:31:04
date last changed
2020-03-10 10:31:04
@misc{8994416,
  abstract     = {The objective of the EU’s trade preference scheme GSP is to alleviate poverty, create jobs and promote international principles and values. Graduation is when a certain product group or beneficiary country loses its EU GSP trade preferences, after having reached a predefined level of development or having become too competitive. This thesis analyses the graduation mechanism in the EU GSP in terms of distributional effects. The ambition is to assess if certain industries have been impacted differently by the graduation policy, notably the industries in which the data suggests that women tend to work. 

In order to examine such potential distributional effects, manufacturing industry data on employment levels is incorporated in a fixed effects model in which the episodes of product graduation from the EU’s GSP function as a dummy variable. The baseline specification regressions cannot establish any relationship between graduation and manufacturing employment. The result of a subsample analysis shows weak evidence of a negative link between graduation and manufacturing employment in female-dominated industries, but the link is not robust.},
  author       = {Brunberg, Emma},
  keyword      = {EU GSP,graduation,manufacturing employment,fixed effects},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Distributional effects of graduation from the EU’s GSP scheme: Can the GSP trade preference scheme have gender-specific effects?},
  year         = {2019},
}