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Single Photon Imaging System for the ESS Linac

Hoflund, Maria LU (2019) EITM01 20191
Department of Electrical and Information Technology
Abstract
To control an accelerating proton beam that travels close to the speed of light, a large number of beam diagnostic instruments are needed. One of the instruments that will be used at the accelerator of the European Spallation Source is a Non-invasive Profile Monitor (NPM). Once installed, this system will measure the transverse beam profile by imaging the fluorescent gas induced by the accelerated proton beam. However, there are two problems that make this system more complex than just using a camera. In the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section where this monitor is going to be placed, the light intensity will be very low. The NPM has to image the beam in a single photon counting mode. To achieve this, an image intensifier is used... (More)
To control an accelerating proton beam that travels close to the speed of light, a large number of beam diagnostic instruments are needed. One of the instruments that will be used at the accelerator of the European Spallation Source is a Non-invasive Profile Monitor (NPM). Once installed, this system will measure the transverse beam profile by imaging the fluorescent gas induced by the accelerated proton beam. However, there are two problems that make this system more complex than just using a camera. In the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section where this monitor is going to be placed, the light intensity will be very low. The NPM has to image the beam in a single photon counting mode. To achieve this, an image intensifier is used to amplify the number of photons. The second problem is the high level of radiation next to the beam. The camera has to be placed in a shielded area away from the beam, and the image is therefore transported via a 10-meter-long fiber bundle to the camera. The goal of this thesis is to understand the characteristics of the NPM and to demonstrate that single photon imaging is possible. The results show that these requirements are fulfilled if some suggested modifications are made. An additional model of the system was implemented in MATLAB, to understand its response when parameters of the system are varied. The work of this thesis, including the model, can be used when designing future systems similar to the NPM. (Less)
Popular Abstract
How do you take a picture of an accelerating proton beam? Is it even possible? And why would you want to? To steer protons at close to the speed of light you need to see what you are doing. As it turns out, a good camera and a bit of fluorescent light makes this a possibility.
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author
Hoflund, Maria LU
supervisor
organization
course
EITM01 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Imaging, European Spallation Source, Single Photon Detection, Beam Diagnostics, Non-invasive Profile Monitor, Fluorescence Profile Monitor
report number
LU/LTH-EIT 2019-731
language
English
id
8996061
date added to LUP
2019-10-11 10:31:19
date last changed
2019-10-11 10:31:19
@misc{8996061,
  abstract     = {To control an accelerating proton beam that travels close to the speed of light, a large number of beam diagnostic instruments are needed. One of the instruments that will be used at the accelerator of the European Spallation Source is a Non-invasive Profile Monitor (NPM). Once installed, this system will measure the transverse beam profile by imaging the fluorescent gas induced by the accelerated proton beam. However, there are two problems that make this system more complex than just using a camera. In the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section where this monitor is going to be placed, the light intensity will be very low. The NPM has to image the beam in a single photon counting mode. To achieve this, an image intensifier is used to amplify the number of photons. The second problem is the high level of radiation next to the beam. The camera has to be placed in a shielded area away from the beam, and the image is therefore transported via a 10-meter-long fiber bundle to the camera. The goal of this thesis is to understand the characteristics of the NPM and to demonstrate that single photon imaging is possible. The results show that these requirements are fulfilled if some suggested modifications are made. An additional model of the system was implemented in MATLAB, to understand its response when parameters of the system are varied. The work of this thesis, including the model, can be used when designing future systems similar to the NPM.},
  author       = {Hoflund, Maria},
  keyword      = {Imaging,European Spallation Source,Single Photon Detection,Beam Diagnostics,Non-invasive Profile Monitor,Fluorescence Profile Monitor},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Single Photon Imaging System for the ESS Linac},
  year         = {2019},
}