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Transitional Landscapes

Sundqvist, Sophia LU (2019) AAHM01 20192
Department of Architecture and the Built Environment
Abstract
This thesis is a propositional study, analysing to what extent conventional concepts of urban housing architecture require updating in response to increasingly progressive living patterns developing in Europe.

The propositional design is a modular system including permanent housing for short-term accommodation - alongside a trail of public walkways - which inhabits, activates and connects a network of abandoned urban green spaces.

Mazara del Vallo, a historic, sandstone producing town on Sicily’s south-west coast, is the site of this study.

Key references for this thesis include works by Pier Vittorio Aureli, Maria Giudici, and OMA’s 2018 study of Sicily’s capital, Palermo.

OMA’s Palermo Atlas contends that, due to climate... (More)
This thesis is a propositional study, analysing to what extent conventional concepts of urban housing architecture require updating in response to increasingly progressive living patterns developing in Europe.

The propositional design is a modular system including permanent housing for short-term accommodation - alongside a trail of public walkways - which inhabits, activates and connects a network of abandoned urban green spaces.

Mazara del Vallo, a historic, sandstone producing town on Sicily’s south-west coast, is the site of this study.

Key references for this thesis include works by Pier Vittorio Aureli, Maria Giudici, and OMA’s 2018 study of Sicily’s capital, Palermo.

OMA’s Palermo Atlas contends that, due to climate change and mass migration, Europe is witnessing increased short-term, transitional living patterns, which do not resemble conventional family structures. This phenomenon is at its most palpable in Sicily, an island bridging the social and physical geographies of Europe, North Africa and Asia.

Giudici’s Familiar Horror argues that the design of contemporary housing architecture is deeply ideological, assuming long-term inhabitation and a traditional family structure as the norm.

While Aureli’s text Life Abstracted provides a profoundly relevant pre-historic example of a nomadic housing typology that catered to short-term, non-nuclear family communities.

This thesis argues that conventions of urban housing architecture must grow to embrace flexibility and adaptability - at the same time as contextual rootedness - in order to provide practical and meaningful homes for a growing population demanding short-term housing solutions.

With a structure that is both uniquely adaptable and grows from an existing civic infrastructure, this thesis’s design study provides a spatialised proposition which addresses the needs of users requiring short term housing as well as rooted, heartfelt homes.

This research topic is vital to understanding how Europe can develop housing in a time where the difference between citizen and non-citizen; visitor and resident, is becoming increasingly blurred. (Less)
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author
Sundqvist, Sophia LU
supervisor
organization
course
AAHM01 20192
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8997360
date added to LUP
2019-11-04 14:56:11
date last changed
2019-11-04 14:56:11
@misc{8997360,
  abstract     = {This thesis is a propositional study, analysing to what extent conventional concepts of urban housing architecture require updating in response to increasingly progressive living patterns developing in Europe.

The propositional design is a modular system including permanent housing for short-term accommodation - alongside a trail of public walkways - which inhabits, activates and connects a network of abandoned urban green spaces.

Mazara del Vallo, a historic, sandstone producing town on Sicily’s south-west coast, is the site of this study.

Key references for this thesis include works by Pier Vittorio Aureli, Maria Giudici, and OMA’s 2018 study of Sicily’s capital, Palermo.

OMA’s Palermo Atlas contends that, due to climate change and mass migration, Europe is witnessing increased short-term, transitional living patterns, which do not resemble conventional family structures. This phenomenon is at its most palpable in Sicily, an island bridging the social and physical geographies of Europe, North Africa and Asia.

Giudici’s Familiar Horror argues that the design of contemporary housing architecture is deeply ideological, assuming long-term inhabitation and a traditional family structure as the norm.

While Aureli’s text Life Abstracted provides a profoundly relevant pre-historic example of a nomadic housing typology that catered to short-term, non-nuclear family communities.

This thesis argues that conventions of urban housing architecture must grow to embrace flexibility and adaptability - at the same time as contextual rootedness - in order to provide practical and meaningful homes for a growing population demanding short-term housing solutions.

With a structure that is both uniquely adaptable and grows from an existing civic infrastructure, this thesis’s design study provides a spatialised proposition which addresses the needs of users requiring short term housing as well as rooted, heartfelt homes.

This research topic is vital to understanding how Europe can develop housing in a time where the difference between citizen and non-citizen; visitor and resident, is becoming increasingly blurred.},
  author       = {Sundqvist, Sophia},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Transitional Landscapes},
  year         = {2019},
}